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  • 10 votes cast
Aug
14
comment Use syslog service to capture data logged to a file not managed by syslog?
Instead of monitoring the log file, might it be feasible to eliminate the extra log file... seems wasteful to write to disk and then read from disk an extra time for every log message...
Aug
14
comment Use syslog service to capture data logged to a file not managed by syslog?
For syslog-ng file monitoring balabit.com/sites/default/files/documents/…
Aug
14
comment Use syslog service to capture data logged to a file not managed by syslog?
Looking through the manpages now... with this approach would you happen to know whether or not there might be issues when the non-syslog log files are rotated, for example, if syslog ended up watching the rotated file instead of the new one?
Aug
14
asked Use syslog service to capture data logged to a file not managed by syslog?
Aug
5
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
6
revised How can I run Debian stable but install some packages from testing?
Corrected the private repository section name.
Jul
6
answered How can I run Debian stable but install some packages from testing?
Apr
10
comment Why is port 443 (but not port 80) being exposed to nmap when iptables is configured to drop the traffic?
Makes sense, thanks for your help!
Apr
10
awarded  Informed
Apr
10
comment Why is port 443 (but not port 80) being exposed to nmap when iptables is configured to drop the traffic?
You were right, iptables on the second box included iptables -t filter -A OUTPUT -m state --state INVALID -j DROP and changing iptables to not drop these packets eliminated the message. So nmap by default seems to be sending invalid packets when scanning port 443 but not other ports. I'm curious, how did you interpret the (somewhat cyrptic) nmap message to diagnose the issue to the source of the scan?
Apr
10
accepted Why is port 443 (but not port 80) being exposed to nmap when iptables is configured to drop the traffic?
Apr
9
asked Why is port 443 (but not port 80) being exposed to nmap when iptables is configured to drop the traffic?
Mar
22
accepted How are the routing tables populated on a Debian system?
Feb
19
asked How are the routing tables populated on a Debian system?
Feb
19
answered How are the routing tables populated on a Debian system?
Jan
2
comment How many bits of entropy per byte read from /dev/random and /dev/urandom?
Sorry, to clarify: data read from /dev/urandom can include any byte value, including bytes that could be interpreted as control characters in the shell, or bytes that wouldn't be valid to use in a URL, et cetera. So encoding / converting the random data into a hexadecimal representation allows the token to be used just about anywhere. Another way to do the conversion would be using something like Python's binascii.hexlify(data)
Jan
2
comment How many bits of entropy per byte read from /dev/random and /dev/urandom?
Data from /dev/urandom includes bytes 0-255 and encoding that data using a hex digest is one way to get the data into a format that plays well with other applications.
Jan
2
comment How many bits of entropy per byte read from /dev/random and /dev/urandom?
The hash in this case is just an easy way to generate a fixed length hex digest.
Jan
2
comment How many bits of entropy per byte read from /dev/random and /dev/urandom?
Thanks for the clarification! Do you know any references discussing /dev/random vs /dev/urandom?
Dec
31
asked How many bits of entropy per byte read from /dev/random and /dev/urandom?