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May
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comment Could `rm -rf / --no-preserve-root` mess up the bios?
@aseq Actually in most cases the program and libraries get cached in memory, notice that with linux you can delete a program binary while it is running and it will continue running to completion. This can actually get really quite far.
May
19
comment How can I create one large partiton over two drives in CentOS?
@MSalters I am not objecting to your suggestion that an alternative may be more appropriate here. Indeed my answer goes into that in more detail. I merely felt your criticism of raid 0 was much more universal and somewhat unwarranted. It certainly has its disadvantages but it does have a very useful niche and certainly is used for reasons other than being old. Line any system it has trade-offs between advantages and issues, but it certainly does have significant advantages.
May
18
answered How can I create one large partiton over two drives in CentOS?
May
18
comment How can I create one large partiton over two drives in CentOS?
@MSalters Raid0 doesn't work in the way you seem to imply, it doesn't store some files on one disk and some files on the other, it stores alternating "stripes" on each disk, each stripe being usually much less than a file, so most files are on both disks, its meaningless to say that it could save the files on one disk, it just isn't like that. It is not designed for reliability and it should not be expected, it is purely for performance and if used for storing important data should be combined with redundancy and good backup. Raid0 is tolerated because of high read performance, not age.
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Jul
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comment RAID-5: Two disks failed simultaneously?
@JamesRyan I agree that it will cause some later problems and I even agree that there are underlying issues here. However it does offer a valid solution on how to get some functionality back and as the OP was talking about data recovery experts I can only assume they do not have backups to get their data back otherwise. In the end, this solution would only be part one of a fix, once this method had got the system booted again, you would probably want to transfer the filesystem to 5 new disks and then importantly back it up.
Jul
23
comment RAID-5: Two disks failed simultaneously?
Shame this got down votes, it actually tries to help the OP fix the mess unlike some of the others. +1
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Jul
12
comment Restrict a Linux user to the files he owns
@Dani_l Their code bases are really very similar, it seems the differences are mostly politics. I personally find UnionFS V2 is the most stable for my systems but many seem to like both, frankly I think either would be a fair choice so by all means use aufs if you find it to work better, I think only testing on your own machine can really determine stability.
Jul
11
comment Restrict a Linux user to the files he owns
@DennisNolte Actually, it does help, even if files are world readable, if they are in a directory you have neither read or execute on you cannot read them anyway.
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Jul
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comment Restrict a Linux user to the files he owns
Also, you can put the files into a directory inside a 000 permissions directory, then nobody can access them even if the files are world readable.
Jul
11
comment Restrict a Linux user to the files he owns
Something to make this a -lot- easier is to use UnionFS to chroot users into a special union of the rootfs in read only mode and a read write home directory, this means they see all the system packages and binaries but writes are automatically done in their home folder. this -must- be coupled with making all of the home directories 700 permissions else users could read files from other users anyway.
Jul
2
comment How do storage IOPS change in response to disk capacity?
On a side note, larger disks usually contain more modern controllers, motors and heads, smaller disks usually just reuse the previous gen ones which are "good enough", so high capacity disks are often faster but not because they are larger but because they are better made.