316 reputation
18
bio website
location
age
visits member for 11 months
seen 2 days ago

Nov
29
awarded  Constituent
Nov
17
awarded  Caucus
Jul
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
23
comment RAID-5: Two disks failed simultaneously?
@JamesRyan I agree that it will cause some later problems and I even agree that there are underlying issues here. However it does offer a valid solution on how to get some functionality back and as the OP was talking about data recovery experts I can only assume they do not have backups to get their data back otherwise. In the end, this solution would only be part one of a fix, once this method had got the system booted again, you would probably want to transfer the filesystem to 5 new disks and then importantly back it up.
Jul
23
comment RAID-5: Two disks failed simultaneously?
Shame this got down votes, it actually tries to help the OP fix the mess unlike some of the others. +1
Jul
21
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
12
comment Restrict a Linux user to the files he owns
@Dani_l Their code bases are really very similar, it seems the differences are mostly politics. I personally find UnionFS V2 is the most stable for my systems but many seem to like both, frankly I think either would be a fair choice so by all means use aufs if you find it to work better, I think only testing on your own machine can really determine stability.
Jul
11
comment Restrict a Linux user to the files he owns
@DennisNolte Actually, it does help, even if files are world readable, if they are in a directory you have neither read or execute on you cannot read them anyway.
Jul
11
awarded  Commentator
Jul
11
comment Restrict a Linux user to the files he owns
Also, you can put the files into a directory inside a 000 permissions directory, then nobody can access them even if the files are world readable.
Jul
11
comment Restrict a Linux user to the files he owns
Something to make this a -lot- easier is to use UnionFS to chroot users into a special union of the rootfs in read only mode and a read write home directory, this means they see all the system packages and binaries but writes are automatically done in their home folder. this -must- be coupled with making all of the home directories 700 permissions else users could read files from other users anyway.
Jul
2
comment How do storage IOPS change in response to disk capacity?
On a side note, larger disks usually contain more modern controllers, motors and heads, smaller disks usually just reuse the previous gen ones which are "good enough", so high capacity disks are often faster but not because they are larger but because they are better made.
Jun
10
comment What's the advantage of synchronizing UID/GID across Linux machines?
I do agree, I just did not want to make the OP think it is impossible, I do agree largely with your suggestion that the best solution is keeping them in sync.
Jun
10
comment What's the advantage of synchronizing UID/GID across Linux machines?
I am not so sure it is correct to say using a networked filesystem prevents fixing issues with differing uids, I know at least one filesystem which supports a uid map allowing you to specify which groups and users match up on different machines.
May
17
comment Is it safe for a production server to have make installed?
@Shadur What difference does having GCC make? If the user already has access to the machine they can upload any copy of gcc trivially. Anyway, gcc can be useful to unprivileged users and not a security risk as long as no privileged users run it.
Apr
18
awarded  Organizer
Apr
18
revised Bash: mv directory one at a time
This question is not really about bash, the user just wants a good tool, I do not think they care what programming languige it is written in.
Apr
18
comment Bash: mv directory one at a time
I think he is copying between different file-systems, not just moving a directory to a new path.
Apr
18
comment Bash: mv directory one at a time
I think the user is using a network file system to export two different directory trees on the same real partition, to copy between them, he is for some reason sending them from one network file system to the other over TCP despite them being on the same disk... Odd I know, but it would cause this issue...
Apr
18
suggested approved edit on Bash: mv directory one at a time