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  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 83 votes cast
Mar
23
comment Creating and deploying a Linux virtual appliance
Thank you. Great answer to a pretty vague question.
Mar
23
accepted Creating and deploying a Linux virtual appliance
Mar
21
asked Creating and deploying a Linux virtual appliance
Mar
21
awarded  Critic
Mar
16
accepted Using NOPASSWD for specific commands in sudoers file, PASSWD for all others
Mar
16
comment Using NOPASSWD for specific commands in sudoers file, PASSWD for all others
That seems to do it. Thanks!
Mar
16
comment Using NOPASSWD for specific commands in sudoers file, PASSWD for all others
I get sudo: unknown defaults entry nopasswd'` when running commands in the list. I'll play with it and see if I can figure out what it's doing.
Mar
16
revised Using NOPASSWD for specific commands in sudoers file, PASSWD for all others
added linux tag
Mar
16
asked Using NOPASSWD for specific commands in sudoers file, PASSWD for all others
Feb
18
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
15
comment Re-gaining root access to an EC2 EBS-boot image
Haven't had the opportunity to test this, but marked as answered since I assume it will work. Thanks.
Feb
15
accepted Re-gaining root access to an EC2 EBS-boot image
Feb
10
accepted Lightweight Revision Control for copying config files from a testing server to production server
Feb
10
comment Re-gaining root access to an EC2 EBS-boot image
Thanks for the answer. I hadn't considered that maybe there would be no password set. Unfortunately passwd asks for my current password. I think the 'ubuntu' account may have been created with $ adduser --disabled-password ubuntu. Any other ideas?
Feb
10
asked Re-gaining root access to an EC2 EBS-boot image
Feb
5
accepted What does the ELB do to determine the health of an instance?
Feb
3
asked What does the ELB do to determine the health of an instance?
Nov
29
awarded  Popular Question
May
1
awarded  Commentator
May
1
comment How can I reset the permissions of /bin /boot /etc and /dev to orignal owner, Ubuntu?
I wasn't really clear in my answer, but the output of the command I displayed above shows in order: filename, user, group, for all the files not owned by root:root on my debian system. I imagine your system uses many, if not all of the same permissions. I don't know if there is a way to restore permissions e.g. with apt