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Jun
1
answered Hyper-V performance and the Save State BIN file
Jun
1
answered Do I need to use Sysprep to clone VMs on my personal lab?
May
23
answered MS Data protection manager restore files from linux vhdx
Apr
22
comment Hyper-V Manager shows 3 sockets/NUMA nodes available but there are only 2
By default, the VM will match the physical machine. I doubt, however, this is how his physical machine is built. I suspect somebody played with the values in the settings.
Apr
22
answered Hyper-V Manager shows 3 sockets/NUMA nodes available but there are only 2
Apr
22
comment Hyper-V Manager shows 3 sockets/NUMA nodes available but there are only 2
Respectfully, this answer is just speculation, and it's not correct. See my response to the question.
Apr
11
answered Hyper-V Guest OS sees partition as RAW
Mar
31
answered Hyper-V virtualization type
Mar
26
answered “Access is denied” trying to bring VM-attached USB hard disk back online in Disk Manager
Mar
12
awarded  Custodian
Mar
12
reviewed Approve MediaWiki on MS SQL Server
Feb
25
comment Is it possible to run production machines on a replication target?
Actually, the replication target will see more or less as many writes to its disks as the primary host saw. So it's not just network bandwidth that gets consumed. You need enough storage throughput, too.
Feb
23
answered Adding new processor to HyperV server?
Feb
10
answered Is Hyper-V CSVFS supported on Linux VMs
Feb
9
comment File Sharing using Hyper-V Shared VHDX
Whether a SAN is turning a pile of disks into a volume or whether that's done with Storage Spaces is of no particular relevance to this discussion. My point is that you will be much happier with a file server.
Feb
8
comment File Sharing using Hyper-V Shared VHDX
The thing that you really need to know is that CSV works by using SMB (the file server protocol) to move data whenever the node in question doesn't own it. So joining several computers together with CSV basically does the same thing as a file server, except in one special situation: When you have a really big file that is exclusively owned by one node, that node can read and write to it directly, provided that the file isn't being changed in size -- i.e. the data in it is being re-written. This is exactly what Hyper-V and SQL Server do. File servers are really good at small files.
Feb
6
comment File Sharing using Hyper-V Shared VHDX
If you create a guest cluster and put CSVFS on top of it, then all the members of that guest cluster will see that (virtual) disk as a local disk, and they will all share it, seeing the files on that disk symmetrically and safely. But so what? The only point in doing that is so that you can run a Scale-Out File Server on top of that, or a SQL server on top of that. If there was any other purpose, then you'd be better served by just giving the VHD to a single VM and using that VM as a file server.
Feb
6
comment File Sharing using Hyper-V Shared VHDX
Yes, I am. Your link is a cookbook for creating a cluster of guest VMs running Windows, but there are other possible uses, all of a similar nature.
Feb
5
answered File Sharing using Hyper-V Shared VHDX
Jan
6
awarded  Nice Answer