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I'm a software architect working at Microsoft on virtualization and other systems topics.


Jun
4
comment Dell VRTX - slow cluster shared storage
Yes, that's why I made a distinction between local caching and coherent caching.
Jun
3
comment Dell VRTX - slow cluster shared storage
If you actually did turn on local caching in the controllers, that would invalidate the cluster file system that you're trying to use, which is probably why you're not seeing the option to do it. If you want to use CSV, any caching has to be coherent across all the hosts that have access to the volume.
May
15
comment Convert Folders to VHD file
If your files are corrupted, then they'll still be corrupted when you convert the volume to a VHD. If they're not corrupted, then ROBOCOPY will work nicely.
May
15
comment Restoring a VM from a backed up snapshot in Windows Server 2008R2
No. It can be backed up while it's running. If it has the Backup Integration Component installed within the VM, the VM will actually keep running through the whole process. If not, it's is paused briefly.
May
13
comment Restoring a VM from a backed up snapshot in Windows Server 2008R2
I think that you missed my point a little. Even in Server 2008R2, when you ask for a backup of a VM (which very much does exist as a feature) what it actually does is create a snapshot of the VM and then allow you to copy that snapshot to other media. It just doesn't label it a "snapshot." It's labeled as a "backup."
Apr
28
comment reached the maximum partitions on my virtual machine
And why are you creating a new partition when you do extend the disk, rather than just extending an existing file system?
Mar
24
comment How to exclude VHDX disk from snapshots on Hyper-v
No. While the VM is powered off, there is no memory assigned to it. Of course, if your VM is powered off, then the file systems have been shut down cleanly and there's no danger of corruption. If you wanted to exclude a VHD from a snapshot while the VM was powered off, you could remove it, take the snapshot, and re-add it. (I know that you'd like that to be one step, but I don't have a better suggestion. It would be a single line of PowerShell code if that's any condolence.)
Mar
5
comment Correct VHDX sector size in Hyper-V enviroment for a RAID array
Those are tiny. I doubt that you'd see much difference.
Dec
2
comment Windows Server 2012 Hyper V Clustering Live migration Hot Failover
There are actually several commercial products that do exactly what you're saying isn't possible. They work by, essentially, continuously migrating the machine to a new host, so that if the primary host fails, the secondary can pick up where the first left off. See the various offerings from Stratus for good examples of this.
Oct
11
comment Hyper-v on 2012R2 startup gen1 vm causes the host to freeze up
You didn't have VMware Workstation and Hyper-V installed simultaneously, did you?
Oct
9
comment Hyper-V Dynamic Memory - virtual machine memory usage and host memory demand do not make sense
TomTom, I'm quite certain about how it works. (The guy who wrote the code is sitting two doors down from me at the moment.) Adding of memory beyond the "startup" value does, in fact add new memory to the VM. That memory can't be removed from Windows entirely, at least not without causing all the device drivers to be rewritten. So it's ballooned.
Oct
4
comment Disk latency within a virtual machine
No, I'm not suggesting they're useless. I'm merely pointing out that time within a VM is virtualized, and thus measurements of anything that tries to look at small time quanta will result in messy data. Data you collect over long periods of time will be generally right. Looking at any small-span time period may not be accurate.
Oct
3
comment Disk latency within a virtual machine
I'm not sure what your terminology is getting at. Yes, CSV is the file system that is typically used for VHDs, and that sits on a volume, which is shared across the host cluster. That volume sits on top of a LUN, which is part of a disk pool, usually (with Server 2008 R2) in a SAN. What, specifically, are you asking?
Sep
23
comment No disks were found on which to perform cluster validation tests
Mapped drives (also called SMB shares) are valid cluster storage, as long as the SMB server is capable of SMB 3.0 or later. But you still won't see any "disks" in the cluster wizard, as you're not presenting disks to the cluster, you're presenting a network share.
Jul
23
comment Why does increasing logical processors in Hyper-V for virtual machine increase performance.
@Dan, that's an issue specific to VMware. It doesn't affect Hyper-V.
Mar
17
comment Automating windows server 2008 installation in hyper V with powershell
You can do the same without making a WIM image first. Just run the offline update against the image in the VHD, by mounting the VHD.
Mar
14
comment migrate a VM from Server 2012 to Windows 8 pro
I misspoke. I've edited my response. You can just import the config files directly.
Mar
9
comment Adding Unattended.xml Files to Hyper-V Powershell Creation?
You'd format the disk presented by the VHD, probably with NTFS. And then you'd put the unattend file at the root of that file system.
Mar
8
comment Adding Unattended.xml Files to Hyper-V Powershell Creation?
A VHD is a file that contains the data that will be perceived by the VM as a disk. They are not shared between your VMs. Each VM has its own. (There are ways of sharing a base image between multiple VMs, but that's a more advanced topic.) You can mount the VHD file as a disk on any machine, whether it's a VM or not. The example I gave was assuming that you would mount it on the machine running the script, at least temporarily. I've also added some detail to the answer.
Feb
14
comment Hyper-v does not shut down pc
Actually, I think that you've titled your question wrong. Hyper-V does shut down your VM, as evidenced by pushing the "shut down" button in the Hyper-V manager. What doesn't work is telling the guest OS to shut itself down, which has little to do with Hyper-V.