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Mar
1
awarded  Commentator
Mar
1
comment What are the risks in backing up private keys on services like Dropbox?
Fair enough; I elaborated to hopefully patch a hole you poked in cjc's answer, which you apparently still think is a hole, so I'll leave it at that.
Mar
1
comment What are the risks in backing up private keys on services like Dropbox?
"the latter" meaning "losing all copies at once"? In this scheme, the encrypted Key A can be stored in an untrusted location, which everyone has inherently more of than trusted locations. Therefore the risk of losing all the encrypted Key A copies is less. In a typical restore setting, yes, speed would be the same if you have a local copy of Key B. However, in the situation of losing a whole computer, driving to the bank to get a copy of Key B out of the vault is slower than going to any working computer and logging into Dropbox to get another copy of the encrypted Key A.
Mar
1
comment What are the risks in backing up private keys on services like Dropbox?
True, you could just keep Key A in those locations. But then with the same trade-offs: slower turnaround time to restore, and possibly increased risk of losing all copies at once if not done well.
Mar
1
answered What are the risks in backing up private keys on services like Dropbox?
Mar
1
comment What are the risks in backing up private keys on services like Dropbox?
@MadHatter: Ah yes, "symmetric" is the wrong term; some were speaking of password-encrypted private keys. My suggestion works for temporarily getting private keys moved around, but for long-term storage I see your point, and I'll clarify my suggestion in an answer of its own.
Feb
29
comment What are the risks in backing up private keys on services like Dropbox?
@MadHatter: To solve your chicken-and-egg problem, you can use public/private key encryption rather than symmetric encryption. On the destination computer, make a new key just for transferring (make it expire in a few days). Put the PUBLIC key in Dropbox to get it to the source computer. Source computer encrypts with public key and drops encrypted file in Dropbox. On destination computer, decrypt with PRIVATE key (making sure to not output the decrypted output into the Dropbox folder).
Jan
1
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
22
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
10
accepted SQLite-like NoSQL option?
Jul
9
comment SQLite-like NoSQL option?
Cute idea, but the CSV file format has no optimization (B-Tree or whatnot) for dealing with very large data sets as most databases do. The linked implementation reads the entire database into memory for every query run.
Jul
9
accepted Remove a file with <Down> in the name?
Jul
9
asked SQLite-like NoSQL option?
Nov
16
awarded  Teacher
Aug
15
awarded  Popular Question
May
23
awarded  Critic
May
23
comment screen not dropping down a line?
You were definitely testing while at the bottom of the Terminal display, and not just the first command entered (near the top of the Terminal)? The line wrapping works fine in the body of the window, just at the bottom it goes wonky.
May
23
comment screen not dropping down a line?
Within the screen program, echo $TERM is screen. Outside that is xterm-color (an SSH connection). What should they be changed to?
May
23
asked screen not dropping down a line?
Mar
18
comment Python version issues
Thank you! I had an extra PATH append in my bash_profile that was throwing it off.