1,545 reputation
614
bio website paulkroon.com
location Glenside, PA
age 28
visits member for 4 years, 8 months
seen yesterday

I'm a sysadmin for a Windows environment (MCSE: Security) with a few Linux boxes as well, which includes handling the whole list of things that come up in an office. If it uses electricity, I pretty much support it. My areas of "expertise" would be VMWare Infrastructure, Exchange 2010, SQL Server 2005/2008, PHP programming, and scripting of all kinds (VBS, Bash, Perl).


Feb
11
comment Should a restore of a database file for Exchange 2010 always be in a “Dirty Shutdown” state?
It seems like my problem was caused by using the "Files and Folders" instead of "Applications" when I was doing the restore. I'll be playing around with it more because I want to get comfortable with the procedures, but I've been able to successfully restore e-mail so I have to assume that was it. I'll mark your response as the answer because it did technically answer the question I posed in the title, but it would be great if anyone else had any specific info on what this restore mode does different from a plain file restore.
Feb
11
comment Should a restore of a database file for Exchange 2010 always be in a “Dirty Shutdown” state?
I had seen that article, but I guess I didn't notice it said that. However, that article does say to use "Applications" as the recovery type, and I've tried to use "Files and Folders." I was hoping to do it this way so that I could recover a single database at a time, but I guess it might be possible that it can't be done that way. I've gotten good at eseutil, so I can try to replay the log files manually once this recover is finished. If it works, I guess that means you can't restore individual files, even when you're doing all the work manually?
Feb
11
awarded  Student
Feb
11
asked Should a restore of a database file for Exchange 2010 always be in a “Dirty Shutdown” state?
Feb
10
comment How to resize the primary partition in Windows Server 2008?
I agree with psbelot and would go with booting into the GParted live CD if you need to move the partitions around. It will let you move things around however you need, but definitely make sure you have backups first to be safe. Also, you might find the boot record gets messed up (I did when I resized Server 2008 with GParted), and you'll need an install CD to fix it. You can find instructions here: ezinearticles.com/….
Feb
9
awarded  Supporter
Feb
8
comment Can I move the Windows directory to a different drive?
From what I can tell, that will be how you can have Windows boot using that directory. You'll probably also need to set the systemroot environment variable (itechtalk.com/thread3595.html), along with any other variable referring to the Windows folder. Before you try anything, make sure you have plenty of backups as there's a good chance this will get Windows into an unbootable state while you're working on it.
Feb
7
awarded  Teacher
Feb
7
answered SQL Server Management Studio 2008 Express installation
Feb
7
answered Can I move the Windows directory to a different drive?
Feb
7
answered Setting up two Exchange servers to receive mail on their old domains while sending and receiving using the same new domain
Feb
7
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
7
answered Domain user cannot connect to Exchange