378 reputation
28
bio website 127.0.0.1
location Richmond, VA
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Apr 12 at 22:26

I mostly do web apps these days. E-commerce backends in PHP, Perl, and/or Interchange (an open-source Perl-based app server), or small ASP.net sites. I still remember enough Javascript, VB.net, C#, C++, C, Java, and x86 assembler language to get by, and i like to think i'm pretty good with MySQL or MS SQL Server.


Feb
13
comment How does CHKDSK /F on locked volume get “scheduled” on reboot?
Although as i look through stuff again, scheduling the check might just schedule Windows to check the dirty bit. You might also need to say fsutil dirty set %SystemDrive% in order to force a full scan.
Feb
13
comment How does CHKDSK /F on locked volume get “scheduled” on reboot?
@MDMoore313: /c is the option to schedule the check. Without it, chkntfs will just tell you whether a check has been scheduled.
Feb
13
comment How does CHKDSK /F on locked volume get “scheduled” on reboot?
@TheCleaner: With chkntfs /c, though, you don't get the "Would you like to schedule...?" prompt. That can be an important difference if you want to dirtify the drive as part of a scheduled task, for example.
Feb
13
comment How does CHKDSK /F on locked volume get “scheduled” on reboot?
For reference: it appears you can use chkntfs /c %SystemDrive% to schedule the boot volume for checking on reboot without mucking around with the registry directly. (Of course, you have to have admin rights to do it.)
Feb
27
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
22
answered Adding an A record where the host name has a forward slash
Sep
21
comment Our clients site is redirecting to a pill scammy site
Not just reinstalling... deleting and reinstalling. The files for this stuff can be separate scripts that can be used to access the host ("remote admin" / "file manager" scripts etc) and even reattach the bad stuff to WP proper.
Jul
7
comment Should maintenance staff have access to server rooms?
4. Do you leave your house's front door unlocked and just lock up all the important stuff you don't want people messing with? I kinda doubt it. Why do that with your server room, considering that the equipment and data in there might very well be worth more than your whole house? :) And considering that if something goes wrong in there, that's your spot (and therefore, ultimately your responsibility)?
Jul
7
comment Should maintenance staff have access to server rooms?
3. It's not about smarts -- it's about specialties. You don't let outsiders wander unsupervised around a construction site or a mechanic's shop either. Or, ironically, an HVAC repair shop. The people who are in there pretty much have to know what to do where and when...or be shepherded around by someone who does. Why, then, should some guy who probably has no training in IT stuff be allowed to wander around in a room with semi-unique hazards, where a bit of water here or a couple of keystrokes there or flipping the wrong switch could wreak havoc?
Jul
7
comment Should maintenance staff have access to server rooms?
2. You're not in contol of those other places. If someone somehow manages to kill power to the whole building or something, there's not much you can do (absent a generator). But if they unplug the server to plug in their vacuum cleaner or something...what is the first thing the PTBs will ask? "Why was that idiot in the server room in the first place?" Hint: "Cause i don't wanna clean it myself" probably won't cut it.
Jul
7
comment Should maintenance staff have access to server rooms?
1. Stealing a workstation, laptop, etc probably won't bring down a company. Stealing the servers, though...very well could. Stealing the data probably could too, depending on what you do with it...but that's a bit harder to get at from some random computer than from the server's console.
May
12
answered How download all files, directories and subdirectoires with wget
Feb
2
revised Why does DNS work the way it does?
added 30 characters in body
Feb
2
comment Why does DNS work the way it does?
The fact is, if you disable the cache on your local machine, you still see the results that are cached by your local network's DNS server. And if you disable that, you're still likely to have your ISP's cache to worry about. Whether you accept that as a common case or not, it's the case i've seen just about every time -- which makes it common enough to be well worth mentioning.
Feb
1
comment Why does DNS work the way it does?
@JdeBP: It's a "widespread misunderstanding" because as far as i've seen in the real world, it's largely true. If you get your address via DHCP, as just about everyone does, then you've almost certainly been given the address of a DNS server that you're supposed to use. Which, in home networks, is almost always the router -- which is basically forwarding to your ISP's DNS. And in small business networks, is usually the domain controller -- which, again, is usually forwarding to the ISP's DNS. It's generally at that point that the iterative stuff takes over.
Feb
1
revised Why does DNS work the way it does?
added 4 characters in body
Feb
1
answered Why does DNS work the way it does?
Dec
6
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
22
comment Linux (CentOS) “duplicate” root user on VPS
Agreed. But it's out there. :) And the fun part: last i checked, su itself was one of those programs. (I experimented with changing root's name, but changed it back once i realized just how much stuff breaks when root isn't "root". :P)
Nov
21
comment Recover an SSH private key?
@MadHatter: Private key files tend to have enough info in them to recreate the public key. (OpenSSH files do, at least, and it'd seem Putty's PPK files do too.) While you can't take the actual key and derive the public key from it, if you have the key file, it apparently contains the private key plus the numbers used to generate both keys.