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918
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location London, United Kingdom
age 43
visits member for 5 years, 6 months
seen 20 hours ago
Quite boring, really. Have faffed about with computers since the mid-80s, have worked as a network engineer, unix sysadmin and (occasionally) developer.

Jan
22
comment ^C no longer sends SIGINT
Additionally, you can (usually) get a half-decent "cooked IO" terminal by doing stty sane.
Jan
20
comment ^C no longer sends SIGINT
Is the terminal set to "brkint" or "-brkint"? Similarly for "-ignbrk" and "ignbrk"?
Jan
9
comment Network simulator tool
If you want to experiment with Cisco devices (and have access to one or more IOS images), there's always DynaMIPS and DynaGen (the latter can be found at dynagen.org ).
Dec
30
comment Weird Apache problem with file
Please update the original question instead of "add an answer", it makes it much easier for people to see what etra information you can give to make it easier to answer.
Oct
23
comment Unknown tcpdump packets
If they're using a hybrid switch/router (like the Cisco 6509) for the physical connection, maybe. Similarly if they're using dot1q sub-interfaces on a router, then using distribution switches. Though it's good practise to switch off protools that aren't needed (liek CDP or STP) on those interfaces.
Oct
6
comment what is the difference between linux and solaris OS?
The only direct Minix heritage in Linux is that the first few iterations used Minix as a development platform (and initially used the Minix file system).
Aug
17
comment Do routers have IP Addresses?
Without an IP address associated with an interface, there is no way for stations on the LAN connected to the interface to resolve eth hardware address of the interface. So, while it's not (necessarily) needed for the administration of the router, it's needed for IP traffic to pass through. A switch does not need an IP address, other than for management, though, as it's purely a "layer 2" device.
Aug
11
comment Linux Routing. Computer A to computer C
Those routes should exist simply by virtue of adding the IP address(es) to the network interfaces.
Aug
11
comment Is it better to use the 192.168.x.x or 10.x.x.x address range for a small business network?
Almost. 192.168.0.0/16 256 (or 254) Class C networks, each able to support 254 devices. However, the actual "class" of network is mostly a moot point in this day and age.
Jul
29
comment Making hosted applications resilient to BGP failures
If the /29 is part of ProviderA's allocation and is not showing up through ProviderB from the core and ProviderA then suddenly no longer announce it, how does the (non-announced) network via ProviderB actually help?
Jun
30
comment What is the fastest network technology these days to couple servers
A hub is by definition not limiting collission domains (they're effectively repeaters, only with more than two ports). A switch should significantly limit your collision domain sizes (although there are cases where packets will be broadcast out). It becomes even better if you use full-duplex links all throughout.
Jun
29
comment Business Internet Outage/Disaster Recovery
If you're lucky, they'll have "independednt routing to site" as an option and at that point, anything that takes out one T1 should, hopefully, leave the other one OK.
Jun
29
comment Most popular misconceptions about networking
Most manufacturers that run multible fabrication lines are probably using a PRNG of some sort to assign the lower 24 bits of the MAC (so as to not need to keep uniqueness between multiple production lines), so for those, you can estimate 50% chance of a collission of you have 2^12 (so 4096) network cards within the same broadcast domain.
Jun
22
comment UPS and power strip interactions?
The "fire hazard" is that the wiring inside the power strip is only rated for a given wattage and plugging more power-strips into it makes it MUCH easier to exceed the wattage and cause overheating inside the unit, with a possible fire as a result.
Jun
15
comment Cisco ASA5510 Bandwidth Shaping/Limiting
Off-hand, I don't know how much license it gives the ASA to burst. The goal of a shaper (as opposed to a policer) is to roughly enforce a speed limit, by delaying packets as necessary, in a relatively graceful manner. Very helpful when you have UDP streams you need to cater for. Policing is more useful with TCP streams or when you want instant feedback on UDP streams. If I remember correctly, you should be able to tune to what extent a shaper can borrow unused bandwidth from the past and over-supscribe future bandwidth usage (but on average it won't do more than you've specified as target).
Jun
12
comment Batch processing on Linux
I haven't tried it with lpd, but I have tried it with lpsched (the old SysV scheduler). There it's simple, as the "printer backends" are all shell scripts (by default). At a very, very previous job, we had a Rayshade "print queue" that rendered jobs and dumped the resulting images in user home directories.
Jun
11
comment Cisco ASA5510 Bandwidth Shaping/Limiting
The (simple, but not entirely correct) difference between shaping and policing is that shaping delays packets, policing drops them. If you have WFQ enabled (look for "fair-queue" or "no fair-queue" in the interface config), it should preferentially drop packets from more active streams. Unfortunately, there isn't a good way of doing "per-stream" limiting without quite deep packet instpection and state-keeping.