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visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Apr 5 '13 at 21:15

I'm an undergraduate research assistant at a neuroscience lab who's been shunted (somewhat willingly, somewhat not) into the additional role of sysadmin.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
4
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
31
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
23
asked Adding local users / passwords on Kerberized Linux box
Jan
22
awarded  Teacher
Sep
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
10
answered No device file for partition on logical volume (Linux LVM)
Jan
8
asked No device file for partition on logical volume (Linux LVM)
Sep
1
awarded  Student
Sep
1
comment How do I unmount a bound /proc in a “dead” chroot?
Thanks so much; that did the trick. It turned out to be daemonized dd holding on to the chroot's kmsg file.
Sep
1
awarded  Scholar
Sep
1
accepted How do I unmount a bound /proc in a “dead” chroot?
Aug
24
comment How do I unmount a bound /proc in a “dead” chroot?
Sorry for the cruddy formatting; I'm new to markdown and have made too many edits to fix it.
Aug
24
comment How do I unmount a bound /proc in a “dead” chroot?
Thanks. Yes, <chroot>/proc and, by extension, <chroot> still exist. And actually, I did try to unmount <chroot>/proc. For instance: _@_:~$ sudo umount -n <chroot>/proc/ [sudo] password for _: umount: <chroot>/proc: device is busy. (In some cases useful info about processes that use the device is found by lsof(8) or fuser(1)) And then, the only process that lsof comes up with is lsof itself: _@_:~$ lsof <chroot>/proc/ COMMAND PID USER FD TYPE DEVICE SIZE NODE NAME lsof 7046 _ 3r DIR 0,3 0 1 <chroot>/proc/ Thanks again.
Aug
24
comment How do I unmount a bound /proc in a “dead” chroot?
Thanks. The directory <chroot>/proc still exists, though.
Aug
20
asked How do I unmount a bound /proc in a “dead” chroot?