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awarded  Notable Question
Aug
18
accepted Some mod_rewrite syntax clarification
Aug
18
comment Some mod_rewrite syntax clarification
Great, thanks for your input
Aug
14
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
14
comment why can't I ssh into my aws ec2 instance? Permission denied (publickey)
You have to use the private key that matches the public key that was loaded into the server when it was created. Are you using the right key?
Aug
13
asked Some mod_rewrite syntax clarification
Jul
31
comment Debian - static ip, /etc/network/interfaces
It's complaining about line 2 in your interfaces file. Is what you pasted above the entire file? Or is their more text that you didn't paste here?
Jul
29
comment Debian - static ip, /etc/network/interfaces
After you've configured the interfaces file and restarted networking, will ifup eth0 bring it up for you?
Jul
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Popular Question
Jun
19
comment Can't Track Down What's Causing Server To Go Out of Memory
Don't increase them. Think of it this way. For every Apache child process, it's going to use RAM. Let's say that each Apache process is taking up 30 MB of RAM. Right now you're allowing a maximum of 50 child processes. If you have 50 child processes at once, that's roughly 1.5GB RAM. Add on let's say 200 MB for MySQL and then another 300 MB for the rest of the system... you're out of memory. So bumping that MaxClients number up is just going to allow the system to spawn more children when you hardly have the resources to handle your current config. So no, do not increase the MaxClients.
Jun
19
revised Can't Track Down What's Causing Server To Go Out of Memory
added 400 characters in body
Jun
19
answered Can't Track Down What's Causing Server To Go Out of Memory
Jun
10
comment How to account traffic on CentOS Linux?
To add to this, you can also use the ss utility to get a list of connections and what application they're related to, for example ss -nap. Between ss and iftop, you should be able to figure it out.
Jun
5
awarded  Enlightened
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Jun
4
comment mysql thread count
this will give you an immediate view of current processes and how long they've been running. If you have a specific query thats killing your server, chances are you'll see multiple instances of that query and you'll see that the processes have all been running longer than normal. A good monitoring program is a must. I've grown to love a tool called MONyog. Check it out.
Jun
4
comment mysql thread count
Gosh, this was so long ago I can't remember. But reviewing, I'm guessing it was an issue with slow queries. One way you can tell if it's slow queries is to set the long_query_time to something a little lower than the default (we have it set to 3 seconds). Most normally queries for our app shouldn't take longer than a second, so 3 is a good measure for something that's slow. You can then check the slow query log and see if you have a higher than normal amount of queries taking too long, and from there you can optimize them. Additionally, you can do show processlist...