241 reputation
16
bio website softwareslave.com
location Kirkland, WA
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Mar 7 at 2:34
Recent graduate from Wentworth Institute of Technology

Nov
1
awarded  Yearling
Oct
31
awarded  Critic
Oct
26
awarded  Commentator
Oct
26
comment Resolving DNS name queries to local computer - Authoritative Parent Zone not found
So in your case you'd probably just allow connections to that RDP machine, but that is much better security-wise than just slapping an RDP host up on the internet.
Oct
26
comment Resolving DNS name queries to local computer - Authoritative Parent Zone not found
All a VPN is is a way of securely connecting two seperate networks. So, instead of having your RDP host be accessible from the internet, you make a VPN host accessible and allow users to VPN into your network. Then they can use your network just like as if they were there plugged into it (or however you configure it to work.)
Oct
25
answered Resolving DNS name queries to local computer - Authoritative Parent Zone not found
Oct
25
comment Resolving DNS name queries to local computer - Authoritative Parent Zone not found
Do you want the remote desktop host to be resolvable from the internet, or just within your local network?
Oct
25
comment SQL Server 2005 Mirror table between databases on same server
Alternatively, if you don't need the data to be to-the-second up to date, you could do an incremental backup of the table and restore it to another schema on a schedule.
Oct
25
comment SQL Server 2005 Mirror table between databases on same server
If you're really having serious lock contention problems on a table of that size/update frequency, I suspect you've got bigger problems and should just look into fixing that instead. However: you could add an insert trigger to the table that just also inserts on your "mirror" table.
Oct
25
comment SQL Server 2005 Mirror table between databases on same server
Kinda depends on what your goals are. I mean, replication is often used to keep another database up to date so if the primary DB fails, you can switch over to the other one, but that would be kinda pointless if they existed on the same server. So, what are you trying to accomplish?
Oct
25
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Oct
25
comment Use Amazon EC2 as a backup server
@MikeMurko yeah I meant EC2 instance. I'm not sure what you mean about conflicting with the FAQ: When the instance is stopped, you stop paying for it. The EBS volumes are not stopped with the instance, they are separate from it and billed separately. If you want to keep your root volume and start a new EC2 instance from it, you can, but you have to pay for the EBS storage that volume uses even when it is not attached to an instance.
Oct
21
awarded  Supporter
Oct
21
answered Use Amazon EC2 as a backup server
Oct
21
comment Use Amazon EC2 as a backup server
Wouldn't you need the database online so you could replicate to it, anyway? Or are you planning on restoring a backup to the EC2 instance for your failover?
Jul
6
awarded  Teacher
Jul
5
comment Restoring a SQL database in a production environment as an update mechanism
It is scary that it is not read-only. Are the live changes somehow mirrored to dev before the updates are made and then restored to prod? I would be worried that in this process you could be losing data.
Jul
5
answered Restoring a SQL database in a production environment as an update mechanism
Sep
30
awarded  Autobiographer