4,577 reputation
11034
bio website mattdm.org
location Somerville, MA
age
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 13 hours ago

I'm the Fedora Project Leader. I work for Red Hat — and for the Fedora community at large! – but my posts here are all my own.

Previously, I was a sysadmin in the Academic Computing group at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and before that, I made Boston University Linux.


Nov
3
revised Deisgn question: DHCP hostname and corporate networks
added 3 characters in body
Nov
3
comment Deisgn question: DHCP hostname and corporate networks
We use static (same address every time) DHCP for servers. This speeds up system deployment, prevents accidental conflicts, and helps us manage the environment better. And on the other hand, we definitely provide DNS addresses for clients as well. This isn't done on a client-push basis, but is instead centrally controlled.
Nov
3
answered Fedora 6, root has internet access, but new user does not
Nov
3
answered Deisgn question: DHCP hostname and corporate networks
Nov
2
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
1
awarded  Editor
Nov
1
revised How to Install Python 2.6 on Fedora 8?
fix typo
Nov
1
comment Secure Network Filesystems for Linux: What are people doing?
FTR: I've confirmed that Celerra supports krb5/krb5i/krb5p. However, it's very, very sparsely documented. (Giving support to the "no one is doing this stuff in the real world" theory.)
Nov
1
answered How to Install Python 2.6 on Fedora 8?
Nov
1
awarded  Teacher
Nov
1
answered Find out if the OS is running in a virtual environment
Nov
1
answered SSHD logs events in the future
Oct
31
comment Secure Network Filesystems for Linux: What are people doing?
XCondE: is there documentation on that publicly at all? I'm not terribly surprised that they support it, but given that they don't seem to mention it ever at all, I'd be (pleasantly, really) surprised if it's much used.
Oct
31
awarded  Supporter
Oct
30
comment Secure Network Filesystems for Linux: What are people doing?
Hubert, we're in an academic environment, and university policy mandates that all traffic on the wire be encrypted. On more controlled server-room-only networks, I'm not so concerned. Perhaps what you're saying reflects common real-world use, though.....
Oct
29
awarded  Student
Oct
29
comment Secure Network Filesystems for Linux: What are people doing?
"NFS3 over IPSEC" helps with the on-the-wire issue, but doesn't address another fundamental NFS problem: if a client box gets rooted, or if you're in a environment where users get root on their own systems, they can trivially impersonate any remote user.
Oct
29
asked Secure Network Filesystems for Linux: What are people doing?
Oct
22
answered Working with a custom YUM repository