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Mar
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
@Jacob I wouldn't say "missing the point" but I was rather doubtful that different OS/net stacks could account for the discrepancy. Nonetheless, in addition to my original tests on WinXP I also did tests on Win7 and Ubuntu. And in all cases I got the same browser DNS failover behavior. So it's not an OS issue either.
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
So that might explain why Chrome doesn't properly fail over, but Chrome only accounts for 20% of our visitors. This still doesn't explain the contradictory data.
Mar
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
My question was not "I am a complete newbie so please advise me what to do", my question was "why does this behave the way it does?" Mostly I am interested in knowing why my tests point to two contradicting answers.
Mar
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
Yes, exactly. The DNS server keeps handing out the same 3 IP addresses (A,B,C), including the bad one (A), and the browser fails over (to B/C) when it cannot connect (to A). At least that's what my browsers do, apart from Chrome. Please re-read my question, slowly.
Mar
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
TTL is irrelevant if the DNS records don't change, which is the case here.
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
3. Yes, the load was fairly evenly split between the 3 servers to start with.
Mar
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
2. I just edited my question to clarify that I made no change at all to DNS. So there's no TTL/propagation issue here; the records for the 3 servers were already there for a long time.
Mar
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
1. AFAIK all browsers have DNS caches. I guess Chrome's issue is that it caches only one IP address even when a DNS query returns more than one.
Mar
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comment Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
This answer is not related to my question. I've clarified the question; this is not about removing from DNS the IP address of a malfunctioning server.
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revised Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
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revised Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records
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asked Browser-based DNS failover using multiple A records