227 reputation
417
bio website facebook.com/thenonsequitur
location New York, NY
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Jul 2 at 16:14
puts 10.downto(1).each{ |i| puts i }
puts 'Blast off!'

puts (10.downto(1).map{ |i| i.to_s } + ['Blast Off!']).join("\n")

(1..10).to_a.reverse.each{ |i| puts i }
puts 'Blast off!'

Jun
26
awarded  Popular Question
May
21
awarded  Constituent
May
20
awarded  Caucus
Apr
8
revised Always get “SIOCADDRT: File exists” when restarting networking on ubuntu
added 346 characters in body
Apr
8
comment Always get “SIOCADDRT: File exists” when restarting networking on ubuntu
There is also an "upstart" script for both up and down, but I'm not using upstart here, I'm using the init.d script. Besides, both upstart scripts seem to be there, one running net-device-up and one running net-device-down. So anything that gets set should get unset first, so I don't think that would be the problem even if I were using these scripts.
Apr
8
comment Always get “SIOCADDRT: File exists” when restarting networking on ubuntu
@javano, thanks I didn't know about those. Unfortunately, none of them seem to be the problem. There are a few scripts for various services, but none of them modify the interface or mess with ip addresses or routes -- they seem to just be netowrk-dependent services that need to to do something when the network starts or stops (ntpdate, sshd, etc...)
Apr
8
comment Always get “SIOCADDRT: File exists” when restarting networking on ubuntu
@javano, is there any way to test this? As far as I know, in Ubuntu, the /etc/network/interfaces file specifies everything that happens on ifup and ifdown, and what I put in the question is the full interfaces file. I know redhat and some other linuxes have a sysconfig directory for additional networking scripts, but I don't think Ubuntu has that.
Apr
8
asked Always get “SIOCADDRT: File exists” when restarting networking on ubuntu
Mar
21
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
4
comment Need to increase nginx throughput to an upstream unix socket — linux kernel tuning?
@tarkeshwar, no, never figured it out. Eventually ended up going with different hardware and and somewhat different server stack instead of solving the problem.
Dec
10
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
29
accepted What does #53 mean in nslookup nameserver address result?
Nov
29
comment What does #53 mean in nslookup nameserver address result?
oh, duh. thanks! will accept you ranswer when the timer allows me to.
Nov
29
asked What does #53 mean in nslookup nameserver address result?
Nov
21
accepted Why is there a separate “unicorn_rails” for Rails apps?
Oct
27
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
16
comment What are the actual benefits of assigning sudo privileges to a user instead of using root?
Also: it's more difficult to royally mess your system up if you make a catastrophic command mis-type running as low-privileged user.
Aug
16
comment What are the actual benefits of assigning sudo privileges to a user instead of using root?
@voretaq7, good answer! Another important aspect of sudo that I think you should add to the list: It lets you easily run command with superuser privileges but with your regular user environment variables and shell settings. This can be accomplished without sudo, but sudo makes it easy.
Jul
25
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
28
comment Need to increase nginx throughput to an upstream unix socket — linux kernel tuning?
I added my ulimit settings to the end of the question.