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seen Jan 17 '11 at 23:21

Feb
7
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
17
answered Could 1 GB of RAM work better than 1.25?
Jan
17
awarded  Scholar
Jan
17
accepted Why do 'iptables -A OUTPUT -j REJECT' at the end of the chain OUTPUT override the previous rules?
Jan
17
comment Why do 'iptables -A OUTPUT -j REJECT' at the end of the chain OUTPUT override the previous rules?
I will get ride of the output restrictive rule because my original intention was to prevent the leak of information in the case the server gets infected with malicious code, but it makes no sense to restrict all the outgoing except one port since that port can be used to send information.
Jan
17
comment Why do 'iptables -A OUTPUT -j REJECT' at the end of the chain OUTPUT override the previous rules?
"Typically with firewalls you worry more about connections coming in than going out." Exactly, it makes no sense to have restrictive output and an open port because it can be used for many proposes. Thanks
Jan
17
comment Why do 'iptables -A OUTPUT -j REJECT' at the end of the chain OUTPUT override the previous rules?
Thanks for your answer, i will keep it on mind but i will get ride of the output restriction, thinking about it it makes no sense since it is for a webserver and malicious code can use the port to pass information out.
Jan
17
comment Why do 'iptables -A OUTPUT -j REJECT' at the end of the chain OUTPUT override the previous rules?
Thanks for your answer, i didn't know that TCP connections are asymmetric, im developer but im new to networking, i will have to study more about this. reading Tanenbaum's Computer Networks from page 1
Jan
16
awarded  Editor
Jan
16
revised Why do 'iptables -A OUTPUT -j REJECT' at the end of the chain OUTPUT override the previous rules?
edited title
Jan
16
asked Why do 'iptables -A OUTPUT -j REJECT' at the end of the chain OUTPUT override the previous rules?