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Jun
1
comment CentOS & moving /var to a new disk/partition
Thanks Damiano. I'd considered the resize myself as well, but the host won't allow me to go larger than a certain size for the primary volume attached to this cloud instance. Looking at this again, I suppose I could double what I have (they allow up to 100GB for a primary disk, and we're using about half of that right now), but allowing /var access to its own volume made initial sense to me, because I'd be able to scale it a bit better that way once moved...alleviating me of the primary volume restrictions that the host imposes on me.
Jun
1
comment CentOS & moving /var to a new disk/partition
Thank you for your comment. I've posted updated information about the system in question. Hopefully I've provided enough info. Thanks!
Jun
1
revised CentOS & moving /var to a new disk/partition
Updated information requested in the comments.
Jun
1
awarded  Commentator
Jun
1
comment CentOS & moving /var to a new disk/partition
Also, I don't think "resizing" will work in this case, because /var is on the root disk, and the root disk with this vendor only allows a certain maximum size. I can add additional volumes in the multiple TB size range...which is what I was thinking of dedicating to /var
Jun
1
comment CentOS & moving /var to a new disk/partition
Thank you. I figured running "no processes" while doing this was the key. Just wasn't sure how to be absolutely sure that all processes related to /var are actually stopped so we can proceed safely. Yes, I have backups of MySQL data. However, I would prefer not to restore a bunch of corrupted databases if it can be avoided. I've inherited this older system, and it's not to my typical specs that I would use when creating a new server for a client. Trying to make lemonade, here.
May
29
asked CentOS & moving /var to a new disk/partition
Mar
6
comment Sourcing a config file in bash
Yeah, getting the path from within the script was an all-around win. That worked beautifully!
Mar
6
awarded  Self-Learner
Mar
6
awarded  Teacher
Mar
6
answered Sourcing a config file in bash
Mar
6
comment Sourcing a config file in bash
That totally helped out. Thank you Aaron!
Mar
6
comment Sourcing a config file in bash
Well that's kind of the issue. Theoretically the script.sh can be executed from just about anywhere on the system. It doesn't really matter where you execute script.sh from...as long as you can supply a correct path to the script to execute it. That's my thinking anyways.
Mar
6
comment Sourcing a config file in bash
Maybe there's a better way to get the path, relative to the script being executed?
Mar
6
asked Sourcing a config file in bash
Jul
17
accepted Listing or Working With a Range in the Shell
Jul
17
comment Listing or Working With a Range in the Shell
Totally did the trick. Thanks!
Jul
17
awarded  Supporter
Jul
17
awarded  Student
Jul
17
asked Listing or Working With a Range in the Shell