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2d
comment Centos 6 soft openfiles 1024?
How is the control panel launched? By systemd?
2d
comment Centos 6 soft openfiles 1024?
There is no "system based max open files", as far as I know. Again, it depends what it is you're trying to do, which you still haven't told us. Whatever launches these scripts either understands limits or doesn't. If it does, tell it to set the limits how you want. If it doesn't, then set the limits before launching the thing that launches these scripts. For example, systemd supports LimitNOFILE.
2d
revised Centos 6 soft openfiles 1024?
added 157 characters in body
2d
comment Centos 6 soft openfiles 1024?
He's already got that part covered. Notice the output of ulimit -n in his question? His issue seems to be with processes that weren't created by a user logging in.
2d
comment Centos 6 soft openfiles 1024?
Can you explain what your outer problem is rather than telling us how you've attempted to solve it? Is there some specific process that needs a higher limit? If so, which process and how is that process being started?
2d
answered Centos 6 soft openfiles 1024?
Feb
4
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
3
comment Location of private key generated via openssl on Windows 10
@John That doesn't say that OpenSSL supports using a ">" to specify an output file. It says to issue a command line with a ">" to a shell that supports using ">" for output redirection. If you read the OpenSSL docs, they say that OpenSSL supports using "-out" to specify that the key be written to a file.
Feb
3
comment Location of private key generated via openssl on Windows 10
You didn't give it a name. Where did you read that OpenSSL supports using ">" to write to a file? My documentation says it uses "-out".
Feb
2
comment Why does a URE cause loss of array during RAID 5 rebuild?
@StrongBad If there's a URE, the rebuild fails. I think you're still missing the entire point of RAID, which is to permit you to continue to operate reliably even if a disk fails, that is, to minimize downtime. As soon as you can't operate reliably, that's it, the RAID has failed. You will always have downtime to get back to reliable operation.
Feb
2
comment Why does a URE cause loss of array during RAID 5 rebuild?
@StrongBad It doesn't make things worse. You're describing a process that requires figuring out which files are affected, restoring those specifically, determining whether the medium is still reliable, and so on -- all before you can resume operation. The whole point of RAID is to minimize this time and risk. Doing a full restore/rebuild is almost always faster and safer.
Feb
2
answered Why does a URE cause loss of array during RAID 5 rebuild?
Feb
1
answered port listening in netstat can't telnet
Feb
1
comment SSL encryption with CNAME redirect
What do you mean by "which server"? There's only one server in your architecture.
Feb
1
comment port listening in netstat can't telnet
Show us the hadoop config the causes the port to be listened on.
Feb
1
comment port listening in netstat can't telnet
What is listening on port 8020?
Feb
1
comment Linux server as router emulating commercial modem
@Joe I don't understand what you disagree over. Do you still insist that "every router is going to have a minimum of two interfaces"? There are two clear reasons why that's false: 1) You can route between networks that share a broadcast domain. 2) There are routers that route but don't forward. For example, it's not unusual to have a router just to maintain a BGP table and it may only have one interface with one IP address.
Feb
1
comment Linux server as router emulating commercial modem
@Joe It's relevant because you wrote, ""every "router" is going to have (a minimum) of two interfaces to enable routing between two networks"", which is false.
Feb
1
comment Linux server as router emulating commercial modem
@Zoredache Usually, yes. Always, no. I have a router ten feet from me that has only one physical interface and no virtual interface. It does routing and NAT between a public and private network that share a broadcast domain. Not the most secure setup, I admit, but it's still a router.