3 replaced http://serverfault.com/ with https://serverfault.com/
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If you are generating a self signed cert, you can do both the key and cert in one command like so:

openssl req  -nodes -new -x509  -keyout server.key -out server.cert

Oh, and what @MadHatter said in his answerhis answer about omitting the -des3 flag.

If you are generating a self signed cert, you can do both the key and cert in one command like so:

openssl req  -nodes -new -x509  -keyout server.key -out server.cert

Oh, and what @MadHatter said in his answer about omitting the -des3 flag.

If you are generating a self signed cert, you can do both the key and cert in one command like so:

openssl req  -nodes -new -x509  -keyout server.key -out server.cert

Oh, and what @MadHatter said in his answer about omitting the -des3 flag.

2 corrected flag name from 3des to -des3; formatting and wording improvements; link to ref'ed answer
source | link

ifIf you are generating a self signed cert, you can do both the key and cert in one command like so;so:

openssl req  -nodes -new -x509  -keyout server.key \
    -out server.cert 

Oh, and what MadHatter@MadHatter said in his answer about omitting the 3des-des3 flag.

if you are generating a self signed cert, you can do both the key and cert in one command like so;

openssl req  -nodes -new -x509  -keyout server.key \
    -out server.cert 

Oh, and what MadHatter said about omitting the 3des

If you are generating a self signed cert, you can do both the key and cert in one command like so:

openssl req  -nodes -new -x509  -keyout server.key -out server.cert

Oh, and what @MadHatter said in his answer about omitting the -des3 flag.

1
source | link

if you are generating a self signed cert, you can do both the key and cert in one command like so;

openssl req  -nodes -new -x509  -keyout server.key \
    -out server.cert 

Oh, and what MadHatter said about omitting the 3des