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in /etc/exports I have:

/home   XXX.XXX.XXX.128/25(rw,no_subtree_check,root_squash) 192.168.1.0/24(rw,no_subtree_check,root_squash)
/home/user  XXX.XXX.XXX.128/25(rw,no_subtree_check,root_squash) 192.168.1.0/24(rw,no_subtree_check,root_squash)

Obviously the shares overlap as the /home/user resolves back to:

  • a root directory of /home/user share
  • "user" subdirectory of "/home" share. This /etc/exports results in a NFS share that works normally through network. I do not know which path is used to access /home/user/file, but both lead to the same file.

However when the /home/user directory is accessed locally, not through nfs, then the python script that does a recursive python os.walk of /home/user directory tree tends to hang the system: the command "stat" hangs at "/home/user" directory (as evident by strace), the system load grows by 1 every two minutes, at some point system ceases to respond to any command in the system prompt. Also as soon as "stat" command hangs it is impossible to ssh to the system from the network.

As soon as automount process is killed then the system works completely normally again. T

The question:

  • what exactly is wrong with overlapping NFS mount. I get there is an "ambiguity" what exactly /nfs/computer/home/user means, but does this confuse just the user, or it actually confuses and breaks automount somehow. If the latter, then why?
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  • Why is your NFS server trying to automount its own exports? – Michael Hampton Jun 16 at 13:15
  • Frankly it makes no sense to me. It may be that there is a symbolic link that has "/nfs/computer" in the pathname somewhere in the file tree. I do not traverse symbolic links, but this is the only thing I came up with. – user746978 Jun 17 at 10:32

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