I'm running a Windows XP desktop in a corporate environment. How can I find out what AD groups I belong to?

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  • 3
    Well, it's from a client/desktop perspective. It'd be pretty easy to figure out if I had access to AD. – chris Feb 10 '10 at 16:50
  • @chirs, perhaps clarify in your question that you mean from the perspective of a client in a Windows domain. – heavyd Feb 10 '10 at 17:09
up vote 218 down vote accepted

Try running gpresult /R for RSoP summary or gpresult /V for verbose output from the command line as an administrator on the computer. It should output something like this:

C:\Windows\system32>gpresult /V

Microsoft (R) Windows (R) Operating System Group Policy Result tool v2.0
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corp. 1981-2001

Created On 2/10/2010 at 10:27:41 AM


RSOP data for OQMSupport01\- on OQMSUPPORT01 : Logging Mode
------------------------------------------------------------

OS Configuration:            Standalone Workstation
OS Version:                  6.1.7600
Site Name:                   N/A
Roaming Profile:             N/A
Local Profile:               C:\Users\-
Connected over a slow link?: No


COMPUTER SETTINGS
------------------

    Last time Group Policy was applied: 2/10/2010 at 10:16:09 AM
    Group Policy was applied from:      N/A
    Group Policy slow link threshold:   500 kbps
    Domain Name:                        OQMSUPPORT01
    Domain Type:                        <Local Computer>

    Applied Group Policy Objects
    -----------------------------
        N/A

    The following GPOs were not applied because they were filtered out
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
        Local Group Policy
            Filtering:  Not Applied (Empty)

    The computer is a part of the following security groups
    -------------------------------------------------------
        System Mandatory Level
        Everyone
        Debugger Users
        IIS_WPG
        SQLServer2005MSSQLUser$OQMSUPPORT01$ACT7
        SQLServerMSSQLServerADHelperUser$OQMSUPPORT01
        BUILTIN\Users
        NT AUTHORITY\SERVICE
        CONSOLE LOGON
        NT AUTHORITY\Authenticated Users
        This Organization
        BDESVC
        BITS
        CertPropSvc
        EapHost
        hkmsvc
        IKEEXT
        iphlpsvc
        LanmanServer
        MMCSS
        MSiSCSI
        RasAuto
        RasMan
        RemoteAccess
        Schedule
        SCPolicySvc
        SENS
        SessionEnv
        SharedAccess
        ShellHWDetection
        wercplsupport
        Winmgmt
        wuauserv
        LOCAL
        BUILTIN\Administrators

USER SETTINGS
--------------

    Last time Group Policy was applied: 2/10/2010 at 10:00:51 AM
    Group Policy was applied from:      N/A
    Group Policy slow link threshold:   500 kbps
    Domain Name:                        OQMSupport01
    Domain Type:                        <Local Computer>

    The user is a part of the following security groups
    ---------------------------------------------------
        None
        Everyone
        Debugger Users
        HomeUsers
        BUILTIN\Administrators
        BUILTIN\Users
        NT AUTHORITY\INTERACTIVE
        CONSOLE LOGON
        NT AUTHORITY\Authenticated Users
        This Organization
        LOCAL
        NTLM Authentication
        High Mandatory Level

    The user has the following security privileges
    ----------------------------------------------

        Bypass traverse checking
        Manage auditing and security log
        Back up files and directories
        Restore files and directories
        Change the system time
        Shut down the system
        Force shutdown from a remote system
        Take ownership of files or other objects
        Debug programs
        Modify firmware environment values
        Profile system performance
        Profile single process
        Increase scheduling priority
        Load and unload device drivers
        Create a pagefile
        Adjust memory quotas for a process
        Remove computer from docking station
        Perform volume maintenance tasks
        Impersonate a client after authentication
        Create global objects
        Change the time zone
        Create symbolic links
        Increase a process working set

Or if you are logged in to a Windows Server OS with the ActiveDirectory PowerShell Module (or Client OS with the Remote Server Administration Tools) try the Get-ADPrincipalGroupMembership cmdlet:

C:\Users\username\Documents> Get-ADPrincipalGroupMembership username | Select name

name
----
Domain Users
All
Announcements
employees_US
remotes
ceo-report
all-engineering
not-sales
Global-NotSales
  • 33
    For reasons probably related to the configuration of my client's network, when I used /v, I received a giant wall of text with the group list buried somewhere inside. I had much better luck with gpresult /r. – Jake May 23 '13 at 18:37
  • 14
    Bit of a sledehammer to crack a nut. WHOAMI is the way forward, or NET USER <user> /domain, although this truncates groups with long names. – Simon Catlin Jul 18 '13 at 19:04
  • 1
    I had to use gpresult /r. NET USER only displayed the first 3 - 5 group memberships. – eddiegroves Aug 6 '15 at 22:40
  • I read this question every time I get a new job. This time it's favourited! – Robino May 25 '16 at 14:16

Use

whoami /groups

This should not only list security groups but distribution groups, if I recall correctly (and which might also be useful to know). Also takes care of nesting, ie you are in group A which is in B, so it shows you as also in B (again I am trying to recall the details here).

In Vista and Win7 natively, for XP you probably need the sp2 support tools (which would also require that you have sufficient priviledges to install them of course). http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=49AE8576-9BB9-4126-9761-BA8011FABF38&displaylang=en

I think you can write in a cmd window:

net user USERNAME /domain

Replace USERNAME with your own username, without domain prefix.

  • 1
    Awesome; this helps me not only see what I have, but what others have, which is useful when I need to see why other users don't have access to something. Excellent work! – Question3CPO Aug 21 '13 at 22:12
  • Will definitely file this one away for the future - carries over to powershell as well. – lunchmeat317 Jun 11 '15 at 18:00
  • Just a comment to say thanks, this is much easier than logging into server to check groups, some other useful info there too. – Adam Dempsey Sep 8 '17 at 8:54

Start - Run - CMD - GPRESULT /r is sufficient -> you don't need to display the full "/v" to visualize group belongings as a client-user as far as AD is concerned (under Windows 7 for sure, but I'm not sure about winxp)

If you don't have access to AD:

Start - Run - CMD - GPRESULT /v

You will see at the end: The user is part of the following security groups

If you're looking for speed then gpresult is s l o w...especially if there are a lot of GPO's applied.

Just run one of the following, one is for local group and the other is for domain groups:-

Local - 'c:\windows\system32\net.exe localgroup' + 'name of group to check'

Domain - 'c:\windows\system32\net.exe group /domain' + 'name of group to check'

Then parse the output for the username you are looking for as the result will list of the users in that group. Hope this helps.

With full credit to Greg Bray's answer... if the result exceeds the screen size and you need to see ALL of it, use the handy redirect(pipe) command: ">" to write the results to file.

So it would become something like this:

C:\Windows\system32>gpresult /V >c:\group_details.txt
  • 1
    A legitimate comment...that should be added as a comment to the answer that you are giving credit to. This doesn't qualify as an answer by itself. – SturdyErde Apr 6 '17 at 13:49

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