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I'm using KVM (through libvirt actually) for a research project. We're live-migrating a virtual machine between different subnets, so after the migration the IP address and routing tables have to be updated, else the VM is unreachable in it's new subnet. The goal is to do this as fast as possible.

Currently I'm using ssh over a link-local IPv6 address to connect to the VM after the live migration. Then it runs a script that assigns the new IP address and gateway. But this adds a lot of unnecessary overhead.

What I'd like to have is a way for a daemon on the virtual machine to detect that a live migration just finished. Are there any hooks I can use?

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If you were doing guest vlan tagging you'd see that change and could script it that way. Alternatively you could use a highly-port-assigned DHCP server on both/all VLANs, with the same MAC listed in multiple scopes, you could then just trigger the refresh on vlan change.

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If I remember correctly, upon completing migration the VM should send a gratuitous packet announcing itself. Anyhow, until the arp tables update, there will always be a bit of lag, not VM -> network, but network -> VM

What you can do is catch an "arriving" VM by polling virsh dominfo A VM migrating to a host will appear as "paused" at first, and as soon as it is "running", you know it has finished migrating. on the target you should get domain started event with details saying it was migrated and on the source you should get stopped/migrated event

The better way would be to use something like http://libvirt.org/git/?p=libvirt.git;a=blob;f=examples/domain-events/events-python/event-test.py on the target you should get domain started event with details saying it was migrated and on the source you should get stopped/migrated event

This is your best bet for catching a libvirt migration event using the proper API.

Catching migrations from within a VM is not possible, because the entire idea of live-migration is that a VM is not aware of it, and shouldn't feel the migration

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I'd think that you'd see something appear in dmesg during such a migration. Can you test and see if you do? If so, that's quite easy to trigger on, either by writing a quick-and-dirty kernel module, or just going the expeditious route of writing a shell-script daemon to watch dmesg.

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