1

I purchased a .org domain from network solutions and I was thinking about using it for a intranet website running IIS6. I don't want this to be a public facing website. How would I set this up?

  • What operating system are you running? If it's Windows Server, it has a DNS server built in; otherwise you'll need to install one. – Skyhawk Jul 27 '10 at 18:22
7

By my understanding, you didn't even need to purchase it. If the site is intranet, you could just set up a DNS server to point LAN computers from any domain to any server. On my LAN, I can point http://google.com to my file share.

| improve this answer | |
  • I came here to post this. Internal DNS is just that...internal. Do you have an internal DNS server? – GregD Jul 27 '10 at 17:51
  • Yes i have to domain controllers – djshortbus Jul 27 '10 at 18:22
  • 1
    @djshortbus: Domain controllers do not always serve DNS. Is the DNS role installed and active on your Domain Controllers? – jscott Jul 27 '10 at 18:25
  • under the dns settings i don't know how to point the domain name to an IIS website on another server with the ip of 192.168.192.113 – djshortbus Jul 27 '10 at 18:26
  • 1
    @djshortbus: Yes, create a new zone using the .org domain you own. Create new Host "A" record(s) in that zone to point the name(s) to the desired IP(s). – jscott Jul 27 '10 at 18:37
3

Of course you can point any domain name to a private IP address. It will only be accessible from the inside.

| improve this answer | |
3

In general you can point ANY host entry in a DNS configuration to ANY IP address.

Specific, you an do it unless your host blocks it (for example by checking it in an editor), but that is not a DNS intrinsic limitation (and one that is arguable - makes possibly sense "unless user overrides it" to avoid stupid mistakes by users with less knowledge.

| improve this answer | |
  • Do you know of any documentation online that will help me out with this process Thanks – djshortbus Jul 27 '10 at 17:24
  • Standard DNS documentation? MS has decent documentation, but otherwise get a book on how DNS works ;) – TomTom Jul 27 '10 at 17:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.