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I have a centos apache2 webserver which is running and I can view the localhost website from localhost or by http://192.168.0.167 (its IP) through a browser on the machine itself, but if I try to view it by its IP on another machine through a browser on the network I can't load the website. Also pinging the machine from another machine works fine. I'm able to connect to the machine via SSH as well with no trouble.

"iptables -L" output:

Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination
RH-Firewall-1-INPUT  all  --  anywhere             anywhere

Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination
RH-Firewall-1-INPUT  all  --  anywhere             anywhere

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain RH-Firewall-1-INPUT (2 references)
target     prot opt source               destination
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere
ACCEPT     icmp --  anywhere             anywhere            icmp any
ACCEPT     esp  --  anywhere             anywhere
ACCEPT     ah   --  anywhere             anywhere
ACCEPT     udp  --  anywhere             224.0.0.251         udp dpt:mdns
ACCEPT     udp  --  anywhere             anywhere            udp dpt:ipp
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            tcp dpt:ipp
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            state RELATED,ESTABLISHED
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            state NEW tcp dpt:ssh
REJECT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            reject-with icmp-host-prohibited

2 Answers 2

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In runtime:

iptables -I RH-Firewall-1-INPUT 7 -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT

startup in /etc/sysconfig/iptables

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  • that did the trick! thanks, now I wonder why that was set up in the first place. this was an out of the box install.
    – Bobalandi
    Jan 23, 2011 at 21:50
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Check SE Linux policies.

semanage port -l | grep http

You can look through /etc/selinux/config for more details.

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