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I'm getting started with Amazon Web Services and I have a few question I'm not sure about. As every (company) webpage I want to use an "office@companyname.com" email adress, but how is that done? I looked up at godaddy.com (for domain registration), the offer me an email adress like I want, but for 3 dollars per month.

Is this possible with AWS? Because at AWS you have just a complex domain which is not very userfriendly or serious.

Thanks in advance! Best regards, john.

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    You're not going to get a good answer to your question here. I actually see a total of 3 different questions you need to ask. You're going to want to break apart your question to be able to get a better response. – Brent Pabst Jun 5 '12 at 12:13
  • @JohnBrunner What you're looking for is a Primer on how the Internet works. AWS provides a variety of services, but none of them are what you're looking for. GoDaddy provides Registrar and various Hosting services, more along the lines of what you want, but there are plenty of other companies that do the same. On a personal level: GoDaddy supports Internet Censorship; something so abusive, pejorative, and draconian that I refuse to do business or help anyone else do business with them. – Chris S Jun 5 '12 at 13:02
  • Thanks for the answer. I know i'm asking like a noob, but these cloud things are totally new for me. I'm missing the big picture, and when i'm missing this i can't understand it. But after reading some theory i come closer to the big picture. For hosting a dynamic webpage there is a ec2 needed (server), a Ebs (for storing data even if the server is down) and amazon route 53 (for human readable web-adresses). Right? Its a little bit a modular concept in my eyes... – John Brunner Jun 5 '12 at 16:53
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    Consider Google Apps. Up to 10 user free, and you get Gmail, Google Docs, etc. all for free with your domain name. – ceejayoz Jun 14 '12 at 19:52
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John,

AWS is an Infrastructure as a Service provider. They don't work like GoDaddy in the traditional shared hosting sense. If you want to setup an e-mail account with AWS you would have to build out an e-mail server first, then configure your account. However with GoDaddy you simply configure the e-mail account through their online portal interface.

AWS is not meant to be a simple shared hosting service, rather it is meant to allow you to build and scale out massive amounts of servers, if you want them. It sounds like you are looking for something fairly simple and AWS is not it. If your company is fairly small take a look at Google Apps, you can setup free e-mail accounts there with little hassle.

  • Thanks for the answer. I know i'm asking like a noob, but these cloud things are totally new for me. I'm missing the big picture, and when i'm missing this i can't understand it. But after reading some theory i come closer to the big picture. For hosting a dynamic webpage there is a ec2 needed (server), a Ebs (for storing data even if the server is down) and amazon route 53 (for human readable web-adresses). Right? Its a little bit a modular concept in my eyes... – John Brunner Jun 5 '12 at 16:52
  • @JohnBrunner Here's a suggestion... use either 1and1.com or discountasp.net to get started, Discountasp.net is my favorite for simple things. They will be more than happy to get you setup and started. I'm not sure you are ready for the complexity that AWS brings to the table yet. – Brent Pabst Jun 5 '12 at 17:06
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John.

Depending on how technical you are this is totally possible with a single AWS instance. You could pop Linux on a small instance, setup handfuls of small websites, each with their own domain and email. ISPConfig is a great tool for this, (http://www.ispconfig.org/) and it is supported on Ubuntu 12 which is also available in AWS, and in their FREE tier.

The email, could if you like, integrate with Amazon SES. You will have a much easier time sending messages from there.

You can also bind a static IP to this single AWS instance keeping your DNS changes to a minimum.

My suggestion, if you feel you're ready for AWS. Start slow and grow into it carefully and cautiously.

Cheers.

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