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I got a Linode VPS with 768MB. On another server (Speedysparrow), also with 768MB, i have Nginx running and it's awesome, as you can see here: http://www.ubuntubrsc.com/. This website, with the setup i talk about bellow, is using about 160~180MB with about 15~20k daily pageviews.

But i'm starting a hentai website and i'm wondering about my webserver. I have been using Nginx with PHP-FPM, Varnish, APC and Percona's MySQL for sometime, and it works as expected, but i'm wondering...

I thought about giving Apache a try because of mod_pagespeed. Sadly there is no mod_pagespeed support for Nginx (by what i know), and it seems to be a really good module to have installed.

Off course, i can (and do) use W3 Total Cache, but i think mod_pagespeed would be great to have anyway. I can always optimize the hell out of Apache too... but i don't know if it will work well in a 768MB VPS... i doubt it will do better than my Nginx setup at least.

Also, there is the security part of the website...

You see, since it's a hentai website, my guess is it will be a target soon or later. I have seem others websites with this content comming down, and as much as i know how to protect Nginx (to at least difficult things a bit), i have seem a lot more resources about this subject for Apache.

Things like the 5G Firewall for example, are focused in Apache. I could rewrite all the rules for Nginx, but it isn't something i'm good at yet.

There is also a problem i'm having with W3 Total Cache + Nginx: if i use Disk Cache (enhanced), i get 404 error in my front page, so i have to use it with APC or normal Disk...

So my question in here is: is mod_pagespeed + all the security resources for Apache worth it? Should i use Apache with mod_pagespeed or i won't get any benefit from it and should just stay with Nginx?

Thanks for your time people :)

  • 4
    Way to let it all hang out, bro. – Wesley Jul 3 '12 at 22:53
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    I don't know of any hentai-serving-specific tools... – gWaldo Jul 3 '12 at 23:15
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    @gWaldo: mod_hentai is the way to go. – womble Jul 4 '12 at 5:45
  • @womble trololol! – gWaldo Jul 4 '12 at 13:07
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Application security is a sticky, many-armed tentacle monster of a problem. If you're concerned that your web service will be a target for attack due to the subject matter, then by all means use Apache. ModSecurity acts as a web application firewall, analyzing incoming traffic for malicious patterns and blocking as necessary. This is no replacement for secure coding practices, it merely helps you mitigate the completely unexpected.

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  • 5
    +1 for the first sentence. – Jeff Ferland Jul 3 '12 at 23:58
  • @Joel I should also have said i use CloudFlare Pro. They do have that already in place, iirc. – Julian Fernandes Jul 4 '12 at 1:37

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