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I'm not sure what will happen when we have a cable fault in token ring network!

The Internet Encyclopedia, G O :

If a cable is cut, the token ring network can continue operate because of redundant path.

Sybex: Network+ Study Guide 4th edition (page 14) :

A single cable fault can bring down the entire network.

Any help for clarification is appreciated.

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    Wow, please tell me this isn't for a production network. I mean, use a freaking wifi hotspot or something. That said, in my experience (a long time ago in college) a single cable fault brought down networks. – Gus Mar 28 '13 at 20:52
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    If you find a token ring network, rip it out and get rid of it. Good god, we were replacing token ring networks with Ethernet 20 years ago. – Michael Hampton Mar 28 '13 at 21:13
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As with anything, it depends. It depends on how it's designed. You can build a ring with redundant paths (can survive the loss of a single link), or without (won't survive.) Building redundancy into everything is a best practice, but sometimes it is compromised to cut costs, decrease implementation time, etc.

But, this sounds like an academic question, since you're quoting references. Do you actually have a TR network? How is it built?

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    It also depends somewhat on the hardware - I had an interesting experience with a particularly ancient MAU (so old it was literally mechanical) where daring to do something as simple as powering off a workstation would open the ring. (By "interesting" I of course mean "Good god get this thing out of here and bring in a 10baseT hub, it would be preferable!") – voretaq7 Mar 28 '13 at 21:25
  • I'm not running things on a token ring network! that was just for more knowledge! – rev Mar 29 '13 at 17:59
  • OK - just so you know, per the FAQ, "Server Fault is for Information Technology Professionals needing expert answers related to managing computer systems in a professional capacity." – mfinni Mar 29 '13 at 18:48

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