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In /home/myusername/mail/mysite.com/info/cur, there's a list of all my raw emails, which looks something like this ...

    1378731701.H58419P6671.mail.myhost.com,S\=6894:2,
    1378732793.H58419P6672.mail.myhost.com,S\=24522:2,RS
    1378733176.H58419P6673.mail.myhost.com,S\=6445:2,RS
    1378733371.H58419P6674.mail.myhost.com,S\=29152:2,S
    1378388419.H58419P6675.mail.myhost.com,S\=2896:2,FRS
    1365606132.H58419P6676.mail.myhost.com,S\=1516:2,DFS
    1374222137.H58419P6677.mail.myhost.com,S\=1540:2,
    1378731776.H58419P6678.mail.myhost.com,S\=8000:2,DST

I'm guessing the number after S\= is the Message ID, followed by status codes.
My first guess is that D = Draft, R = Read, S = Sent, F = Flagged, T = Deleted or something. But what does the "2" mean?

Where is there a reference/guide for translating these status codes?

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This looks like a mailbox in "maildir" format.

"maildir" is a format that stores each email in a separate file (unlike for example the "mbox" format). Parts of the file name indicate the status of the mail.

The part before the colon (":") is just a unique name for the mail file (to avoid conflicts if multiple programs write to the same mailbox concurrently). The part after the colon is the mail status. The "2," just means that what follows is a list of status flags. The flags are (according to the spec):

  • P (passed): the user has resent/forwarded/bounced this message to someone else.
  • R (replied): the user has replied to this message.
  • S (seen): the user has viewed this message, though perhaps he didn't read all the way through it.
  • T (trashed): the user has moved this message to the trash; the trash will be emptied by a later user action.
  • D (draft): the user considers this message a draft; toggled at user discretion.
  • F (flagged): user-defined flag; toggled at user discretion.

For more information:

  • So "2" is the version of the info following the comma, which are the first letters of: "Passed, Replied, Seen, Trashed, Draft, Flagged". Awesome :) Thank you! – neokio Sep 10 '13 at 10:21

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