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We have a need in our office network to procedurally drop incoming packets on an Windows XP machine acting as a server.

By procedurally we mean to drop a percentage of packets incoming to the XP machine from a specific IP address.

Another option is to introduce intermittent latency for an incoming IP address.

closed as off-topic by Sven, mdpc, Nathan C, Cristian Ciupitu, Greg Askew Jun 2 '14 at 0:10

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions must be relevant to professional system administration. Server Fault is dedicated to professional system and network administrators. End user and enthusiast questions are off-topic (contact your system administrator or hire a professional to help you out). Please see the Help Center for more information." – Sven, mdpc, Nathan C, Greg Askew
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    You have a need in your office to replace Windows XP (which isn't a server OS to begin with) with something more modern and not out of support. Other than that, this sounds like a development question. – Sven May 30 '14 at 16:38
  • The xp machine is a virtual machine. We also have a need for this to be XP. Ill ask i the appropriate section then – Mike May 30 '14 at 16:42
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    You are going to have edit your question and work pretty hard to convince people that you are meeting the professional capacity requirement here. As it stands it is fast on it's way to being closed. – kce May 30 '14 at 16:52
  • That is fair, I expected it wasn't the best question. I am out of the office at the moment, if you want to close it you may as well, i will revise and re-ask. – Mike May 30 '14 at 16:55
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    @MichaelJMulligan It appears that your question is flagged as being "not professional" enough. There is lengthy debate on meta as to this subject. In the effort of trying to be a valuable, and professional, contributor, I would like to suggest some changes to your question. For starters, your situation here is weird. Normally you would be best to perform this on a router rather than a client OS. If you need help with that, you can see this question. – Adam Jun 2 '14 at 21:13
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Take a look at WANem - The Wide Area Network emulator.

You can set it up as a VM with a bootable CD-rom drive. Once booted, the web interface will let you use it as a proxy to slow down connections, drop packets, induce jitter, latency, and a number of other cool tricks.

  • So, create two NICs, route the xp traffic through and play. I'll have a look. – Mike May 30 '14 at 16:52
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    Right. Quickest setup is to create a VM with no hard drive, 2 nics. Set it to boot from CD. Configure the two NICs, go to the web admin page to set your rules, then point at WANem from your test client/IP. Pretty easy. – Jim G. May 30 '14 at 16:55

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