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am experiencing a problem with my system. Here's what happens.

I have two servers running Windows Server 2008 R2 that act as primary and secondary domain controllers. I have a NAS which is part of the domain and I have several client machines running Windows XP. These machines have a script that maps a network share of the NAS to a local drive on the machines using a domain account using the "net use" command of Windows. So far, so good.

I have been asked to apply some domain controller policies and noticed that the software (other software using AD) no longer worked as expected. So I decided to revert back all the domain controller policies to the "standard" of Windows Server 2008 R2. So, here's the deal: sometimes when I tried to run the script I get the "System error 1326 has occurred. Logon failure: unknown user name or bad password." If I look the user on the primary DC it says the account has been locked.

Now, I don't see why this should happen, since I have reverted all the settings back to the starting configuration. Furthermore, the problem is not machine-dependent (it can happen when I run the script on any client) and there is no certain amount of tries to lock out the account (it can happen on the very first run or after several runs).

It is driving me crazy, please if anyone has experienced something similar, help!

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    I fear you might be from the stone age. Windows XP? Also, PDCs haven't been a thing since windows 2000. Also I doubt your GPOs are causing this but you'll have to look more at what the script is up to. Correlation does not imply causality. – Falcon Momot Jun 10 '14 at 8:01
  • I have been asked to apply some domain controller policies and noticed that the software (other software using AD) no longer worked as expected. - What does that mean, exactly? – joeqwerty Jun 10 '14 at 17:34
  • What's the net use command that you're using? Does it attempt to specify any account details or passwords? – Adam Thompson Jun 16 '14 at 10:10
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If I look the user on the primary DC it says the account has been locked

Someone (or something) has locked out the account, usually by entering an incorrect password too many times in a row. You can change your account lockout policies/thresholds, and/or troubleshoot the issue, in order to ultimately fix the root cause, in which case, Microsoft makes some lockout management/analysis tools that might come in handy. (Or I suppose, you could do nothing... or even just complain about the problem... all your options do have their charms.)

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