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After installing Zimbra I have a web client running on port 8443 and 8080. On the machine itself I can access using

http://localhost:8443

I want to allow users access to this web client via a reverse proxy server. The root web context is already used so I want to serve the web client through a folder. So for example

https://www.mydomain.com/webmail 

which is proxy for

https://localhost:8443/webmail

For this setup I think I need to change the web context of the Zimbra web client so that it will run from

https://localhost:8443/webmail

and not

http://localhost:8443

Zimbra CLI allows change of port but I did not find change of context. Is this possible? How do I do it?

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NO, that configuration doesn't exist in zimbra. HTTP service on zimbra can't run in web context like above.

Instead change Zimbra web context, you can use Apache for alter zimbra response using mod_proxy_html.

This module provides an output filter to rewrite HTML links in a proxy situation, to ensure that links work for users outside the proxy. It serves the same purpose as Apache's ProxyPassReverse directive does for HTTP headers, and is an essential component of a reverse proxy.

For example, if a company has an application server at appserver.example.com that is only visible from within the company's internal network, and a public webserver www.example.com, they may wish to provide a gateway to the application server at http://www.example.com/appserver/. When the application server links to itself, those links need to be rewritten to work through the gateway. mod_proxy_html serves to rewrite foobar to foobar making it accessible from outside.

This solution based on this answer and this blog.

For performance concern, I suggest you test that configuration. The biggest bottleneck will be in mod_proxy_http because this module will perform search and replace in every request. See the comment about it performance in here.

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