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I have one website called Default Web Site on IIS that grabs all incoming traffic by using all unassigned IP address and omitting the hostname on the binding

So I can access it locally by going to the browser and typing in:

http://localhost/index.html

I can access it on another box in the Network, by opening up the browser and replacing local host with the machine name (webapps) like this:

http://webapps/index.html

That all works fine.


Now I've added a second website that uses the hostname intra.company.com in the binding for the site.

As mentioned in setting Host Name in IIS to www.example.com, I added the following to my hosts file located in C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc

# localhost name resolution is handled within DNS itself.
#   127.0.0.1       localhost
#   ::1             localhost
    127.0.0.1       intra.company.com

Now, locally, I get the right page if I browse to:

http://intra.company.com/index.html

My question is, can I somehow navigate to that address from another computer, similar to how I was connecting to the site hosted on localhost.

Something like this:

http://webapps.intra.company.com/index.html
http://webapps/intra.company.com/index.html
http://webapps:intra.company.com/index.html

But none of those wild guesses at composing the url work.

Any Ideas?

Note 1: This might be resolvable through changing the DNS server on the network, but I can't access that for now, so I would like to see if there's a way route to a box plus a hostname.

Note 2: Also, I could add a virtual folder to the Default Web Site and redirect requests to localhost plus a folder name to the new website, but this feels like the wrong approach. I really do have two different websites that will resolve to different host names that have very different access patterns so keeping them separate seems ideal.

  • 1
    Where you casually say "two websites that will resolve", the resolving there is DNS resolution. DNS requests for those hostnames need to return the IP address of the server. When you say the problem is resolvable through changing the DNS server, that's not how to 'resolve the problem', that's how to 'configure it properly so it works'. – TessellatingHeckler Oct 23 '14 at 17:44
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Remote clients need to be able to resolve that name, either via hosts file entries or via DNS. If you don't have access to the DNS server that those clients use then you'll have to create hosts file entries on those clients for that name.

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