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I want to discover all my neighbors who enabled ipv6 protocol and still alive. I tried ip -6 neighbor show but it shows nothing.

Can someone recommend a tool and show some examples? Thanks.

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    Is there actually any IPv6 traffic on your network? Dec 1, 2014 at 3:56
  • Wireshark allows ipv6 as a filter, which would be one way to look for ND/RA packets.
    – cpt_fink
    Dec 1, 2014 at 4:31
  • @Douglas Su - if you are happy with the answer below please mark it as a correct answer to award the author for the time spent trying to help you. Thanks!
    – MLu
    Dec 2, 2014 at 21:04

2 Answers 2

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Best to ping a special all nodes on a link multicast address - ff02::1 - and wait for the responses:

~ $ ping6 -I eth0 ff02::1
PING ff02::1(ff02::1) from fe80::a11:96ff:fe04:50cc wlan0: 56 data bytes
64 bytes from fe80::a11:96ff:fe02:50ce: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.080 ms
64 bytes from fe80::1eaf:f7ff:fe64:ec8e: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=1.82 ms (DUP!)
64 bytes from fe80::6676:baff:feae:8c04: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=4047 ms (DUP!)
64 bytes from fe80::5626:96ff:fede:ae5f: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=4047 ms (DUP!)
64 bytes from fe80::5626:96ff:fede:ae5f: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=3049 ms (DUP!)
64 bytes from fe80::6676:baff:feae:8c04: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=3049 ms (DUP!)
[...]
^C

A couple of points here:

  • you must specify the interface: -I eth0
  • The responses are link-local addresses - they can easily be converted to your global address by replacing the leading fe80: with your subnet's prefix, e.g. with 2001:db8:1234:abcd: if that's your subnet's prefix.

See http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv6-multicast-addresses/ipv6-multicast-addresses.xhtml for some other multicast addresses other than ff02::1 that may be of an interest.

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    Personally I prefer to use -c to have the ping command stop automatically and -n such that it won't attempt reverse DNS, like this: ping6 -c2 -n ff02::1%eth0. Replacing the link local prefix with the global prefix will often give you the node's global address, but not always, it depends on the specific configuration.
    – kasperd
    Dec 1, 2014 at 9:48
  • 5
    "The responses are link-local addresses - they can easily be converted to your global address by replacing the leading fe80: with your subnet's prefix, e.g. with 2001:db8:1234:abcd:" That's not necessarily true. IPv6 can have, and even requires if addresses other than the link-local address, multiple networks on the same interface, and the IID portions of the addresses do not even need to be remotely the same. You must have a link-local address, but you can also have multiple global and/or ULA addresses on the same interface, and none need have the same IID or even prefix length.
    – Ron Maupin
    Jul 6, 2017 at 2:28
  • Is there a way to do this from Windows? Windows' ping doesn't seem to have a "-I" equivalent.
    – BlueMonkMN
    Mar 5, 2020 at 10:00
  • How do you remove the duplicates and only get the different ones?
    – Andyc
    Aug 5, 2021 at 22:18
-6

I used a free software by NirSoft, called network tools. It automatically loads all your network information and you don't need the black cmd box.

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    how awesome is that, i hope it's an electron app!!!!!111!
    – znarf
    Oct 12, 2017 at 8:02
  • I would assume "the black cmd box" is much more helpful in learning about a problem than any given black box software.
    – Christian
    May 15, 2020 at 14:45

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