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We have 10+ public windows computers in a dormitory and we want to be able to create login names for everyone living here. The idea is this: anyone could login with her/his username and access her/his files, while maintaining the integrity of the computers: so the users should not be able to install programs/modify the system.

Can I accomplish this using a Linux server? If yes, how?

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The obvious answer is to install Samba to make the Linux server be a "Primary Domain Controller", or PDC. The longer answer (which I have no doubt that someone is vainly trying to write even now) is really not suited to this format, and I would really prefer that someone wanting to do this read the actual manual - not too much to ask, I think.

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An alternative approach, if everyone is using Windows 7 (yes, yes, I know) is to use the new homegroup feature of Win7.

But I prefer the PDC solution with Samba. You could also do the same with a Windows server - Windows 2008 Foundation should be affordable at academic prices (it's about $250 commercial, so I'd expect it to come under $50 academic) and even Small Business Server (which bundles in Exchange) may not be out of the question.

Of course, if you have other reasons to prefer a Linux server, or your experience is with Linux rather than Windows, then go with your preference; I'm just suggesting an alternative.

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If you want to lock out local system changes on the clients, look at a product like Faronics Deep Freeze. You reboot, the computer goes back to the state it was in when last "frozen". I find it cathartic to delete the Windows subdirectory until it crashes then reboot...

You don't mention how you're handling login authentication, but I would agree that for file serving you can use Linux with Samba or use a more all-in-one approach of something like FreeNAS. Makes creating software RAID arrays and sharing files a snap.

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You would use LDAP for logins, authentication, and privileges. Then samba would handle file storage once people are logged in.

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The best option would be to use windows steady state in conjunction with a windows fileserver/domain controller. Another benefit to that approach is that users that want to use their personal machines but share files have that ability

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IMO the best option in this situation is to use Windows Steady State to manage the PCs, and require the users to manage their own files on removable media. Have a single, automatic "guest" login that doesn't allow installing applications, and schedule the pc to reboot every night. Steady State will wioe any changes to the system.

Yes, you can configure a PDC, Active Directory domain, etc. However, trying to manage user accounts for what I infer to be limited-duration users incurs a lot of overhead that you probably don't need (or really want). If you do, however, decide to do this, I highly suggest configuring an Active Directory based domain. This will give you the most flexibility in managing the clients via Group Policy.

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Have you considered using a terminal server (Linux or Windows) instead? The clients could then be thin clients, perhaps using something like ThinStation, with a configuration that will only allow connection to your TS server.

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