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My company has three subnets total of which two subnets have the same set of ip addresses... 192.168.0.x. This has not been an issue before but we are going to establish a VPN connection between two routers. So now my network will look like the above diagram.

Client A is a standard windows desktop box with two nics installed. Windows default settings. No bridging. Here is how I would like each machine to function...

Client A --> 192.168.0.70 --> Client C

Client B --> 192.168.0.70 --> Client D

My understanding is that by default windows routes outgoing traffic according to each NIC's ip address. If so after I establish the VPN the routing should be functioning as descried correct? If not what can I do to get that functionality?

P.S.

I do realize the ideal thing to do would be changing one of my 192.168.0.x subnets to something else. For reasons outside my control this is not an option.

  • I'm not understanding your question or your diagram. On the right side of your diagram you have computers with ip addresses from both subnets. That can't possibly work. – joeqwerty Aug 6 '15 at 19:39
  • There are three subnets total. Does the edit clear it up for you? – abaldwin99 Aug 6 '15 at 19:48
  • Possible duplicate of serverfault.com/questions/548888/… – ErikE Aug 6 '15 at 20:29
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This is a bad idea.

Ok, that being said, as long as Client D will never, ever need to get to anythng on Client C or it's subnet this might work. Client A should have it's default gateway set on the NIC in the 192.168.111.0 subnet, and the NIC on the 192.168.0.0 subnet MUST NOT HAVE a default gateway set. Or your packets will be very confused as to where to go.

I cannot stress enough how bad of an idea this is. Especially if there is going to be more than one machine configured like Client A.

  • Yes needless to say I am unhappy with this setup. I have two OEMs for industrial equipment claiming that the IP addresses are hard-coded and can't be changed. The manufacturing machines I'm working with are amazing from a mechanical standpoint but they don't have anything close to best practices when it comes to networking. – abaldwin99 Aug 7 '15 at 13:36
  • I've had my fair share of dealings with industrial computing issues. My sympathies. – Mr. Smythe Aug 7 '15 at 15:38

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