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I'm trying to configure sudo in such a way that I don't have to enter my password when I connect from a specific IP range. I tried to this with the following line in my /etc/sudoers file:

%wheel  10.1.2.0/24 = (ALL)   NOPASSWD: ALL

visudo doesn't give an error when I close it, so the syntax is valid. But when I log in from an server in the 10.1.2.0/24 ip range with a user which is in the wheel group, I still need to supply the password of the account:

[cybertinus@server ~]$ id
uid=500(cybertinus) gid=500(cybertinus) groups=500(cybertinus),10(wheel),48(apache)
[cybertinus@server ~]$ who
cybertinus     pts/0        2015-09-30 09:57 (10.1.2.3)
cybertinus     pts/1        2015-09-30 13:03 (10.1.2.3)
[cybertinus@server ~]$ sudo -i
[sudo] password for cybertinus:

What I did notice however is that the following line is added to my /var/log/secure when I enter an incorrect password at this prompt:

Sep 30 13:04:31 server sudo: pam_unix(sudo-i:auth): authentication failure; logname=cybertinus uid=500 euid=0 tty=/dev/pts/1 ruser=cybertinus rhost=  user=cybertinus

rhost= is empty. So my theory is that sudo doesn't get the remote host passed on from the ssh session. Is there a way to let sudo know from which host this interactive ssh session is running?

I do know that this is a security risk. But the IP range in question is the IP range I use on my VPN network. In other words: it is not connected to the internet directly. If an hacker gets onto my VPN network, I have another problem ;).

In order for you to get the complete picture, this is my entier /etc/sudoers file:

## Sudoers allows particular users to run various commands as
## the root user, without needing the root password.
##
## Examples are provided at the bottom of the file for collections
## of related commands, which can then be delegated out to particular
## users or groups.
##
## This file must be edited with the 'visudo' command.

## Host Aliases
## Groups of machines. You may prefer to use hostnames (perhaps using
## wildcards for entire domains) or IP addresses instead.
# Host_Alias     FILESERVERS = fs1, fs2
# Host_Alias     MAILSERVERS = smtp, smtp2

## User Aliases
## These aren't often necessary, as you can use regular groups
## (ie, from files, LDAP, NIS, etc) in this file - just use %groupname
## rather than USERALIAS
# User_Alias ADMINS = jsmith, mikem


## Command Aliases
## These are groups of related commands...

## Networking
# Cmnd_Alias NETWORKING = /sbin/route, /sbin/ifconfig, /bin/ping, /sbin/dhclient, /usr/bin/net, /sbin/iptables, /usr/bin/rfcomm, /usr/bin/wvdial, /sbin/iwconfig, /sbin/mii-tool

## Installation and management of software
# Cmnd_Alias SOFTWARE = /bin/rpm, /usr/bin/up2date, /usr/bin/yum

## Services
# Cmnd_Alias SERVICES = /sbin/service, /sbin/chkconfig

## Updating the locate database
# Cmnd_Alias LOCATE = /usr/bin/updatedb

## Storage
# Cmnd_Alias STORAGE = /sbin/fdisk, /sbin/sfdisk, /sbin/parted, /sbin/partprobe, /bin/mount, /bin/umount

## Delegating permissions
# Cmnd_Alias DELEGATING = /usr/sbin/visudo, /bin/chown, /bin/chmod, /bin/chgrp

## Processes
# Cmnd_Alias PROCESSES = /bin/nice, /bin/kill, /usr/bin/kill, /usr/bin/killall

## Drivers
# Cmnd_Alias DRIVERS = /sbin/modprobe

# Defaults specification

#
# Disable "ssh hostname sudo <cmd>", because it will show the password in clear.
#         You have to run "ssh -t hostname sudo <cmd>".
#
#Defaults    requiretty

#
# Refuse to run if unable to disable echo on the tty. This setting should also be
# changed in order to be able to use sudo without a tty. See requiretty above.
#
Defaults   !visiblepw

#
# Preserving HOME has security implications since many programs
# use it when searching for configuration files. Note that HOME
# is already set when the the env_reset option is enabled, so
# this option is only effective for configurations where either
# env_reset is disabled or HOME is present in the env_keep list.
#
Defaults    always_set_home

Defaults    env_reset
Defaults    env_keep =  "COLORS DISPLAY HOSTNAME HISTSIZE INPUTRC KDEDIR LS_COLORS"
Defaults    env_keep += "MAIL PS1 PS2 QTDIR USERNAME LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE"
Defaults    env_keep += "LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES"
Defaults    env_keep += "LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE"
Defaults    env_keep += "LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS _XKB_CHARSET XAUTHORITY"

#
# Adding HOME to env_keep may enable a user to run unrestricted
# commands via sudo.
#
# Defaults   env_keep += "HOME"

Defaults    secure_path = /sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin

## Next comes the main part: which users can run what software on
## which machines (the sudoers file can be shared between multiple
## systems).
## Syntax:
##
##  user    MACHINE=COMMANDS
##
## The COMMANDS section may have other options added to it.
##
## Allow root to run any commands anywhere
root    ALL=(ALL)   ALL

## Allows members of the 'sys' group to run networking, software,
## service management apps and more.
# %sys ALL = NETWORKING, SOFTWARE, SERVICES, STORAGE, DELEGATING, PROCESSES, LOCATE, DRIVERS

## Allows people in group wheel to run all commands
%wheel  10.1.2.3=(ALL)   NOPASSWD: ALL
%wheel  ALL=(ALL)   ALL

## Same thing without a password
# %wheel    ALL=(ALL)   NOPASSWD: ALL
## Allows members of the users group to mount and unmount the
## cdrom as root
# %users  ALL=/sbin/mount /mnt/cdrom, /sbin/umount /mnt/cdrom

## Allows members of the users group to shutdown this system
# %users  localhost=/sbin/shutdown -h now

## Read drop-in files from /etc/sudoers.d (the # here does not mean a comment)
#includedir /etc/sudoers.d

You see a reference to /etc/sudoers.d at the end. This is the contents of that directory:

[root@server ~]# ls /etc/sudoers.d | wc -l
0

In other words: In /etc/sudoers.d is nothing that could overrule the normal /etc/sudoers file.

  • 1
    why do you expect sudo knows where from you are connected? – Jakuje Sep 30 '15 at 11:24
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The host list feature in sudo checks/matches the host names, IP addresses, network numbers, netgroups of the host on which sudo is executed, not those of a remote host.

The idea is that a single universal sudoers file can be distributed to a large numbers of servers/workstations and certain privileges are only granted to users on a subset of systems.

Check the EXAMPLES section at the bottom of the manual

# /etc/sudoers
# Runas alias specification
Runas_Alias OP = root, operator

# Host alias specification
Host_Alias  SPARC = bigtime, eclipse, moet, anchor :\
        SGI = grolsch, dandelion, black :\
        ALPHA = widget, thalamus, foobar :\
        HPPA = boa, nag, python
Host_Alias  CUNETS = 128.138.0.0/255.255.0.0
Host_Alias  CSNETS = 128.138.243.0, 128.138.204.0/24, 128.138.242.0
Host_Alias  SERVERS = master, mail, www, ns

# example users
jack        CSNETS = ALL
jen         ALL, !SERVERS = ALL 
bob         SPARC = (OP) ALL : SGI = (OP) ALL

The user jack may run any command on the machines in the CSNETS alias (the networks 128.138.243.0, 128.138.204.0, and 128.138.242.0). Of those networks, only 128.138.204.0 has an explicit netmask (in CIDR notation) indicating it is a class C network. For the other networks in CSNETS, the local machine's netmask will be used during matching.

The user bob may run anything on the SPARC and SGI machines as any user listed in the OP Runas_Alias (root and operator.)

The user jen may run any command on any machine except for those in the SERVERS Host_Alias (master, mail, www and ns).

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