2

I have a Windows Server 2012 r2 with 2 NICs. 1 local(169.254.1.1/24) and 1 "public"(conected to another local network, 10.0.10.47) interfaces. I have configured DNS, DHCP ONLY on the local interface, and NAT in the public. I have a pc connected to the local network and it gets a correct ip(169.254.1.20) and can make ping to the server local interface, but I cannot reach the 10.0.10.47 interface from my pc. I know there are several variables but Ive searched so much sites and didn't found any solution.

More info:

  • Both firewalls are disabled(just to remove some variables)

  • I can reach internet from my 10.0.10.47 interface, but It doesn't mather because I cannot even reach the 10.0.10.47 ip from my pc.

  • Just 1 default gateway configured in each host(that's not the problem), client default gateway: 169.254.1.1, server default gateway: 10.0.10.2.

  • All the scenary is running on Hyper-V.

  • The pc is running a windows 8 enterprise.

EDIT >>>>

  • My DNS service resolves internet names to the client, so it is working.

Also Ive followed that guides:

Keep in mind this laboratory is just for testing. I'll be adding more info by demand, I don't know what else data to add. Thanks in advance.

SOLVED(thanks to @joeqwerty)

I was using an invalid local ip range(169.254.1.1/24). That range is included in the range used by the APIPA protocol(169.254.0.1 through 169.254.255.254) as described here: http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/A/APIPA.html. So it means that my 10.0.10.47 was recieving the pings from the client(169.254.1.20) , but not replying because of that issue.

LAST EDIT:

Here is the rfc that says that 169.254/16 range is not routable: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3927#section-1.6

Just changed my local range to 192.168.1.1/24 and everything is working ok.

  • 1. If you want the server to act as a router then you'll need to add the RRAS role to the server. 2. APIPA doesn't configure a default gateway so it isn't a "routable" address range. It's meant for communication confined to a single network. 3. You should be assigning a "real" ip address configuration to the clients, including the default gateway and DNS servers. – joeqwerty Oct 15 '15 at 3:27
  • 1. As I said, I have NAT configured, and in the second link I posted is explained how to configure the RRAS role to the server(I've done the same). 2. It's the first time that I hear about APIPA, but anyways as I said, I have 1 default gateway per host, configured by DHCP on the client, and manually on the external/public interface of the server(2nd link). 3. I dont know what did you mean by a "real" ip, but my client has the DNS configured by DHCP to, and has a valid ip. Sorry if I misunderstood any of your points. I'll add some more info. – Jose Oct 15 '15 at 6:29
  • In the second point, I meant 1st link. – Jose Oct 15 '15 at 6:45
  • Ok...I've been searching about APIPA, I didn't even know that the ip range that I was using was used by that protocol to...so I've changed my local ip range from 169.254.1.1/24 to 192.168.1.1/24 and everything is working perfectly. Thank you so much @joeqwerty! – Jose Oct 15 '15 at 14:31
  • Glad to help... – joeqwerty Oct 15 '15 at 14:39
1
  1. If you want the server to act as a router then you'll need to add the RRAS role to the server.

  2. APIPA doesn't configure a default gateway so it isn't a "routable" address range. It's meant for communication confined to a single network.

  3. You should be assigning a "real" ip address configuration to the clients, including the default gateway and DNS servers.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.