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We have a windows network, with 2 DC's the primary DC is Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard and the secondary is Windows 2008 R2 Enterprise, both are DNS servers and they point to each other first then they point to themselves as the secondary and the loopback address is added as the third DNS address. I also have forwarders configured on both DNS servers that point to our ISPs DNS servers first, then Google's Public DNS servers after that.

Our firewall has a public dns server (Google public DNS) as the primary, local DNS server as the secondary and ISP DNS server as the third DNS option.

Our problem is our clients cannot get to a website that is a forwarding address until I access that webpage from one of the DNS servers on our network, then it will resolve the domain address right away and it will keep resolving the address for about an hour or so then I have to repeat the process to get the site to pull up again.

Can someone please help or point me in the right direction?

I have tried numerous configurations and the problem has been going on for about a month or so now.

Thanks!

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    Our firewall has a public dns server (Google public DNS) as the primary, local DNS server as the secondary and ISP DNS server as the third DNS option. - That's not related to your clients DNS resolution, unless they also use the firewall for DNS, which they shouldn't, or your DNS server is using the firewall as a forwarder, which I don't recommend. Our problem is our clients cannot get to a website that is a forwarding address - What do you mean? A website that is a forwarding address? I don't understand that statement. – joeqwerty Oct 15 '15 at 3:01
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Sounds like you didn't have recursion enabled on your DNS server. When your DNS only refers client to ISP/Google DNS servers for external names, the lookup is going to fail because firewall is not open between your client and external DNS. Once you perform the lookup on DNS server itself, it caches the result so client gets it from local cache straight.

Enable recursion so internal DNS can grab the records on behalf of your clients.

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