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Let's imagine I have created an Azure virtual machine, a small one initially. I have installed SQL Server and created databases. Also hosted to website by IIS on the virtual machine. I can see the performance of the small one is not up to the mark. I want to upgrade to a larger machine more powerful one. I know, I can do this from Azure portal.

I have already fully configured this machine with databases and websites running on the small VM. I need to know if I lose all my data and hosted websites if I change size of Virtual Machine (VM) from Small to large from Azure portal? I am worried that if this upgrade I may lose data and website.

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Its should not affect your data. Because your VHD is stored in a blob, which is completely separate from the Virtual Machine resources running the OS within the VHD

Check the following link for further details

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/18602205/will-upgrading-azure-vm-wipe-out-vm

  • I don't really understand what you mean by "VHD is stored in a blob, which is completely separate from the Virtual Machine resources running the OS within the VHD." The VM's primary vhd has the entire VM's OS disk. There's nothing separate. – David Makogon Nov 19 '15 at 11:48
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Here's how it breaks down for disks on an Azure VM:

  • The OS disk is a vhd backed by blob storage. It's persistent (durable), and unaffected by VM size changes. In fact, it can even survive even if you delete the VM (you can preserve the VHD, as an option, when deleting a VM).
  • The working disk is an in-chassis disk (either standard disk or SSD, depending on VM sku). This disk is ephemeral, and at-risk, especially when changing VM size.
  • All attached disks are backed by blob storage and are persistent, just like the OS disk, and likewise, you won't lose your data when you change VM size. Specific to attached-disks: You may attach up to two disks per core. This becomes very important when attaching max # of disks, and then attempting to downsize the VM.

These rules apply equally to Linux and Windows VMs.

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