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I tried setting up a VPN on my Debian 8.2 Server using OpenVPN which was working fine. After a few days I was not getting any internet connection anylonger using OpenVPN and I saw using ipconfig /all (Windows Client) that no gateway was assigned anylonger.

OpenVPN server.conf

#################################################
# Sample OpenVPN 2.0 config file for            #
# multi-client server.                          #
#                                               #
# This file is for the server side              #
# of a many-clients <-> one-server              #
# OpenVPN configuration.                        #
#                                               #
# OpenVPN also supports                         #
# single-machine <-> single-machine             #
# configurations (See the Examples page         #
# on the web site for more info).               #
#                                               #
# This config should work on Windows            #
# or Linux/BSD systems.  Remember on            #
# Windows to quote pathnames and use            #
# double backslashes, e.g.:                     #
# "C:\\Program Files\\OpenVPN\\config\\foo.key" #
#                                               #
# Comments are preceded with '#' or ';'         #
#################################################

# Which local IP address should OpenVPN
# listen on? (optional)
;local a.b.c.d

# Which TCP/UDP port should OpenVPN listen on?
# If you want to run multiple OpenVPN instances
# on the same machine, use a different port
# number for each one.  You will need to
# open up this port on your firewall.
port 1194

# TCP or UDP server?
;proto tcp
proto udp

# "dev tun" will create a routed IP tunnel,
# "dev tap" will create an ethernet tunnel.
# Use "dev tap0" if you are ethernet bridging
# and have precreated a tap0 virtual interface
# and bridged it with your ethernet interface.
# If you want to control access policies
# over the VPN, you must create firewall
# rules for the the TUN/TAP interface.
# On non-Windows systems, you can give
# an explicit unit number, such as tun0.
# On Windows, use "dev-node" for this.
# On most systems, the VPN will not function
# unless you partially or fully disable
# the firewall for the TUN/TAP interface.
;dev tap
dev tun

# Windows needs the TAP-Win32 adapter name
# from the Network Connections panel if you
# have more than one.  On XP SP2 or higher,
# you may need to selectively disable the
# Windows firewall for the TAP adapter.
# Non-Windows systems usually don't need this.
;dev-node MyTap

client-to-client

# SSL/TLS root certificate (ca), certificate
# (cert), and private key (key).  Each client
# and the server must have their own cert and
# key file.  The server and all clients will
# use the same ca file.
#
# See the "easy-rsa" directory for a series
# of scripts for generating RSA certificates
# and private keys.  Remember to use
# a unique Common Name for the server
# and each of the client certificates.
#
# Any X509 key management system can be used.
# OpenVPN can also use a PKCS #12 formatted key file
# (see "pkcs12" directive in man page).
ca ca.crt
cert server.crt
key server.key  # This file should be kept secret

# Diffie hellman parameters.
# Generate your own with:
#   openssl dhparam -out dh1024.pem 1024
# Substitute 2048 for 1024 if you are using
# 2048 bit keys. 
dh dh2048.pem

# Configure server mode and supply a VPN subnet
# for OpenVPN to draw client addresses from.
# The server will take 10.8.0.1 for itself,
# the rest will be made available to clients.
# Each client will be able to reach the server
# on 10.8.0.1. Comment this line out if you are
# ethernet bridging. See the man page for more info.
server 10.8.0.0 255.255.255.0

# Maintain a record of client <-> virtual IP address
# associations in this file.  If OpenVPN goes down or
# is restarted, reconnecting clients can be assigned
# the same virtual IP address from the pool that was
# previously assigned.
ifconfig-pool-persist ipp.txt

# Configure server mode for ethernet bridging.
# You must first use your OS's bridging capability
# to bridge the TAP interface with the ethernet
# NIC interface.  Then you must manually set the
# IP/netmask on the bridge interface, here we
# assume 10.8.0.4/255.255.255.0.  Finally we
# must set aside an IP range in this subnet
# (start=10.8.0.50 end=10.8.0.100) to allocate
# to connecting clients.  Leave this line commented
# out unless you are ethernet bridging.
;server-bridge 10.8.0.4 255.255.255.0 10.8.0.50 10.8.0.100

# Configure server mode for ethernet bridging
# using a DHCP-proxy, where clients talk
# to the OpenVPN server-side DHCP server
# to receive their IP address allocation
# and DNS server addresses.  You must first use
# your OS's bridging capability to bridge the TAP
# interface with the ethernet NIC interface.
# Note: this mode only works on clients (such as
# Windows), where the client-side TAP adapter is
# bound to a DHCP client.
;server-bridge

# Push routes to the client to allow it
# to reach other private subnets behind
# the server.  Remember that these
# private subnets will also need
# to know to route the OpenVPN client
# address pool (10.8.0.0/255.255.255.0)
# back to the OpenVPN server.
;push "route 192.168.10.0 255.255.255.0"
;push "route 192.168.20.0 255.255.255.0"

# To assign specific IP addresses to specific
# clients or if a connecting client has a private
# subnet behind it that should also have VPN access,
# use the subdirectory "ccd" for client-specific
# configuration files (see man page for more info).

# EXAMPLE: Suppose the client
# having the certificate common name "Thelonious"
# also has a small subnet behind his connecting
# machine, such as 192.168.40.128/255.255.255.248.
# First, uncomment out these lines:
;client-config-dir ccd
;route 192.168.40.128 255.255.255.248
# Then create a file ccd/Thelonious with this line:
#   iroute 192.168.40.128 255.255.255.248
# This will allow Thelonious' private subnet to
# access the VPN.  This example will only work
# if you are routing, not bridging, i.e. you are
# using "dev tun" and "server" directives.

# EXAMPLE: Suppose you want to give
# Thelonious a fixed VPN IP address of 10.9.0.1.
# First uncomment out these lines:
;client-config-dir ccd
;route 10.9.0.0 255.255.255.252
# Then add this line to ccd/Thelonious:
#   ifconfig-push 10.9.0.1 10.9.0.2

# Suppose that you want to enable different
# firewall access policies for different groups
# of clients.  There are two methods:
# (1) Run multiple OpenVPN daemons, one for each
#     group, and firewall the TUN/TAP interface
#     for each group/daemon appropriately.
# (2) (Advanced) Create a script to dynamically
#     modify the firewall in response to access
#     from different clients.  See man
#     page for more info on learn-address script.
;learn-address ./script

# If enabled, this directive will configure
# all clients to redirect their default
# network gateway through the VPN, causing
# all IP traffic such as web browsing and
# and DNS lookups to go through the VPN
# (The OpenVPN server machine may need to NAT
# or bridge the TUN/TAP interface to the internet
# in order for this to work properly).
# push "redirect-gateway def1"
push "redirect-gateway def1 bypass-dhcp"

# Certain Windows-specific network settings
# can be pushed to clients, such as DNS
# or WINS server addresses.  CAVEAT:
# http://openvpn.net/faq.html#dhcpcaveats
# The addresses below refer to the public
# DNS servers provided by opendns.com.
push "dhcp-option DNS 208.67.222.222"
push "dhcp-option DNS 208.67.220.220"

# Uncomment this directive to allow different
# clients to be able to "see" each other.
# By default, clients will only see the server.
# To force clients to only see the server, you
# will also need to appropriately firewall the
# server's TUN/TAP interface.
;client-to-client

# Uncomment this directive if multiple clients
# might connect with the same certificate/key
# files or common names.  This is recommended
# only for testing purposes.  For production use,
# each client should have its own certificate/key
# pair.
#
# IF YOU HAVE NOT GENERATED INDIVIDUAL
# CERTIFICATE/KEY PAIRS FOR EACH CLIENT,
# EACH HAVING ITS OWN UNIQUE "COMMON NAME",
# UNCOMMENT THIS LINE OUT.
;duplicate-cn

# The keepalive directive causes ping-like
# messages to be sent back and forth over
# the link so that each side knows when
# the other side has gone down.
# Ping every 10 seconds, assume that remote
# peer is down if no ping received during
# a 120 second time period.
keepalive 10 120

# For extra security beyond that provided
# by SSL/TLS, create an "HMAC firewall"
# to help block DoS attacks and UDP port flooding.
#
# Generate with:
#   openvpn --genkey --secret ta.key
#
# The server and each client must have
# a copy of this key.
# The second parameter should be '0'
# on the server and '1' on the clients.
;tls-auth ta.key 0 # This file is secret

# Select a cryptographic cipher.
# This config item must be copied to
# the client config file as well.
;cipher BF-CBC        # Blowfish (default)
;cipher AES-128-CBC   # AES
;cipher DES-EDE3-CBC  # Triple-DES

# Enable compression on the VPN link.
# If you enable it here, you must also
# enable it in the client config file.
comp-lzo

# The maximum number of concurrently connected
# clients we want to allow.
;max-clients 100

# It's a good idea to reduce the OpenVPN
# daemon's privileges after initialization.
#
# You can uncomment this out on
# non-Windows systems.
user nobody
group nogroup

# The persist options will try to avoid
# accessing certain resources on restart
# that may no longer be accessible because
# of the privilege downgrade.
persist-key
persist-tun

# Output a short status file showing
# current connections, truncated
# and rewritten every minute.
status openvpn-status.log

# By default, log messages will go to the syslog (or
# on Windows, if running as a service, they will go to
# the "\Program Files\OpenVPN\log" directory).
# Use log or log-append to override this default.
# "log" will truncate the log file on OpenVPN startup,
# while "log-append" will append to it.  Use one
# or the other (but not both).
;log         openvpn.log
;log-append  openvpn.log

# Set the appropriate level of log
# file verbosity.
#
# 0 is silent, except for fatal errors
# 4 is reasonable for general usage
# 5 and 6 can help to debug connection problems
# 9 is extremely verbose
verb 3

# Silence repeating messages.  At most 20
# sequential messages of the same message
# category will be output to the log.
;mute 20

Then I tried setting up a PPTP service using pptpd (apt-get install pptpd) and set it up. I can connect to the VPN, but I again have neither a default gateway nor access to the internet.

/etc/pptpd.conf

###############################################################################
# $Id$
#
# Sample Poptop configuration file /etc/pptpd.conf
#
# Changes are effective when pptpd is restarted.
###############################################################################

# TAG: ppp
#   Path to the pppd program, default '/usr/sbin/pppd' on Linux
#
#ppp /usr/sbin/pppd

# TAG: option
#   Specifies the location of the PPP options file.
#   By default PPP looks in '/etc/ppp/options'
#
option /etc/ppp/pptpd-options

# TAG: debug
#   Turns on (more) debugging to syslog
#
#debug

# TAG: stimeout
#   Specifies timeout (in seconds) on starting ctrl connection
#
# stimeout 10

# TAG: noipparam
#       Suppress the passing of the client's IP address to PPP, which is
#       done by default otherwise.
#
#noipparam

# TAG: logwtmp
#   Use wtmp(5) to record client connections and disconnections.
#
logwtmp

# TAG: bcrelay <if>
#   Turns on broadcast relay to clients from interface <if>
#
#bcrelay eth1

# TAG: delegate
#   Delegates the allocation of client IP addresses to pppd.
#
#       Without this option, which is the default, pptpd manages the list of
#       IP addresses for clients and passes the next free address to pppd.
#       With this option, pptpd does not pass an address, and so pppd may use
#       radius or chap-secrets to allocate an address.
#
#delegate

# TAG: connections
#       Limits the number of client connections that may be accepted.
#
#       If pptpd is allocating IP addresses (e.g. delegate is not
#       used) then the number of connections is also limited by the
#       remoteip option.  The default is 100.
#connections 100

# TAG: localip
# TAG: remoteip
#   Specifies the local and remote IP address ranges.
#
#   These options are ignored if delegate option is set.
#
#       Any addresses work as long as the local machine takes care of the
#       routing.  But if you want to use MS-Windows networking, you should
#       use IP addresses out of the LAN address space and use the proxyarp
#       option in the pppd options file, or run bcrelay.
#
#   You can specify single IP addresses seperated by commas or you can
#   specify ranges, or both. For example:
#
#       192.168.0.234,192.168.0.245-249,192.168.0.254
#
#   IMPORTANT RESTRICTIONS:
#
#   1. No spaces are permitted between commas or within addresses.
#
#   2. If you give more IP addresses than the value of connections,
#      it will start at the beginning of the list and go until it
#      gets connections IPs.  Others will be ignored.
#
#   3. No shortcuts in ranges! ie. 234-8 does not mean 234 to 238,
#      you must type 234-238 if you mean this.
#
#   4. If you give a single localIP, that's ok - all local IPs will
#      be set to the given one. You MUST still give at least one remote
#      IP for each simultaneous client.
#
# (Recommended)
#localip 192.168.0.1
#remoteip 192.168.0.234-238,192.168.0.245
# or
#localip 192.168.0.234-238,192.168.0.245
#remoteip 192.168.1.234-238,192.168.1.245

localip <PUBLIC_IP_OF_DEBIAN_SERVER>

pptpd-options

###############################################################################
# $Id$
#
# Sample Poptop PPP options file /etc/ppp/pptpd-options
# Options used by PPP when a connection arrives from a client.
# This file is pointed to by /etc/pptpd.conf option keyword.
# Changes are effective on the next connection.  See "man pppd".
#
# You are expected to change this file to suit your system.  As
# packaged, it requires PPP 2.4.2 and the kernel MPPE module.
###############################################################################


# Authentication

# Name of the local system for authentication purposes
# (must match the second field in /etc/ppp/chap-secrets entries)
name pptpd

# Optional: domain name to use for authentication
# domain mydomain.net

# Strip the domain prefix from the username before authentication.
# (applies if you use pppd with chapms-strip-domain patch)
#chapms-strip-domain


# Encryption
# (There have been multiple versions of PPP with encryption support,
# choose with of the following sections you will use.)


# BSD licensed ppp-2.4.2 upstream with MPPE only, kernel module ppp_mppe.o
# {{{
refuse-pap
refuse-chap
refuse-mschap
# Require the peer to authenticate itself using MS-CHAPv2 [Microsoft
# Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol, Version 2] authentication.
require-mschap-v2
# Require MPPE 128-bit encryption
# (note that MPPE requires the use of MSCHAP-V2 during authentication)
require-mppe-128
# }}}




# Network and Routing

# If pppd is acting as a server for Microsoft Windows clients, this
# option allows pppd to supply one or two DNS (Domain Name Server)
# addresses to the clients.  The first instance of this option
# specifies the primary DNS address; the second instance (if given)
# specifies the secondary DNS address.
# Attention! This information may not be taken into account by a Windows
# client. See KB311218 in Microsoft's knowledge base for more information.
#ms-dns 10.0.0.1
#ms-dns 10.0.0.2

# If pppd is acting as a server for Microsoft Windows or "Samba"
# clients, this option allows pppd to supply one or two WINS (Windows
# Internet Name Services) server addresses to the clients.  The first
# instance of this option specifies the primary WINS address; the
# second instance (if given) specifies the secondary WINS address.
#ms-wins 10.0.0.3
#ms-wins 10.0.0.4

# Add an entry to this system's ARP [Address Resolution Protocol]
# table with the IP address of the peer and the Ethernet address of this
# system.  This will have the effect of making the peer appear to other
# systems to be on the local ethernet.
# (you do not need this if your PPTP server is responsible for routing
# packets to the clients -- James Cameron)
proxyarp

# Normally pptpd passes the IP address to pppd, but if pptpd has been
# given the delegate option in pptpd.conf or the --delegate command line
# option, then pppd will use chap-secrets or radius to allocate the
# client IP address.  The default local IP address used at the server
# end is often the same as the address of the server.  To override this,
# specify the local IP address here.
# (you must not use this unless you have used the delegate option)
#10.8.0.100

# Debian: do not replace the default route
nodefaultroute


# Logging

# Enable connection debugging facilities.
# (see your syslog configuration for where pppd sends to)
#debug

# Print out all the option values which have been set.
# (often requested by mailing list to verify options)
#dump


# Miscellaneous

# Create a UUCP-style lock file for the pseudo-tty to ensure exclusive
# access.
lock

# Disable BSD-Compress compression
nobsdcomp

# Disable Van Jacobson compression
# (needed on some networks with Windows 9x/ME/XP clients, see posting to
# poptop-server on 14th April 2005 by Pawel Pokrywka and followups,
# http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?t=111343175400006&r=1&w=2 )
novj
novjccomp

# turn off logging to stderr, since this may be redirected to pptpd,
# which may trigger a loopback
nologfd

# put plugins here
# (putting them higher up may cause them to sent messages to the pty)

ms-dns 8.8.8.8
ms-dns 8.8.4.4
nobsdcomp
noipx
mtu 1490
mru 1490

iptables -L

Chain INPUT (policy DROP)
target     prot opt source               destination
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere
fail2ban-postfix  tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             multiport dports http,https,smtp,submission,pop3,pop3s,imap2,imaps,sieve
fail2ban-dovecot  tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             multiport dports http,https,smtp,submission,pop3,pop3s,imap2,imaps,sieve
fail2ban-roundcube  tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             multiport dports http,https,smtp,submission,pop3,pop3s,imap2,imaps,sieve
fail2ban-default  tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere
fail2ban-default  tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             state RELATED,ESTABLISHED
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere
ACCEPT     icmp --  anywhere             anywhere             icmp echo-request
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:ssh
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:http
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:https
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:smtp
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:submission
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:pop3
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:pop3s
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:imap2
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:imaps

Chain FORWARD (policy DROP)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain fail2ban-default (2 references)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain fail2ban-dovecot (1 references)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain fail2ban-postfix (1 references)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain fail2ban-roundcube (1 references)
target     prot opt source               destination

What could have broken the VPN (since it was working before)? An update changing important settings / files? How could I fix it?

Sincerely, Kia.

0

First, you need to enable FORWARD for ppp interface:

iptables -A FORWARD -o ppp+ -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -i ppp+ -j ACCEPT

echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

Then you should masquerade your vpn clients to have internet:

iptables -A POSTROUTING -t nat -o ppp+ -j MASQUERADE

In your openvpn server config, also you should have : push "redirect-gateway def1" to make default gateway

In your pptpd.conf look for nodefaultrouteand disable it.

I hope this can help you.

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