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My main purpose is to provide SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS) on a single physical machine running on say cloud provider premises. Just a remote box that should be accessible worldwide through VPN.

Since SSAS uses only Windows authentication and there will be several dozens of users connected to it I need Active Directory Domain Services running. As we know Windows Server 2012 Standard license lets us run up to two virtualized server. Thus now I have one physical WS 2012 R2 with Hyper-V and RRAS roles installed and one virtual WS 2012 R2 with AD DS, DNS and DHCP roles. Both servers are connected to internal network Hyper-V virtual switch with static IPv4 addresses 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.2 correspondingly. And everything works fine at the moment. I would like it keep working the same way all the time :)

But I wonder if it's possible to use DHCP reservations (please remember DHCP server starts after a physical machine since it's on virtual machine!) to get rid of static IP addressing and if so does it make any sense and advantages.

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    But I wonder if it's possible to use DHCP reservations (please remember DHCP server starts after a physical machine since it's on virtual machine!) to get rid of static IP addressing and if so does it make any sense and advantages. - I don't quite understand what you're asking. Does using DHCP make sense? Sure. Does using reservations make sense? Sure, if you need to use reservations. What exactly are you asking about regarding reservations? What hosts do you want to use reservations for? – joeqwerty Jan 30 '16 at 18:26
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    To clarify my original comment: Using DHCP and DHCP reservations makes perfect sense in many scenarios. I'm not sure it makes sense in yours as you didn't provide any context for the use of DHCP and DHCP Reservations. Are you meaning to use DHCP for your servers? If so, then the answer is probably; No, it doesn't make sense. – joeqwerty Jan 30 '16 at 18:34
  • @joeqwerty, yes, I meant DHCP reservations for the servers mentioned. Thank you for reply! – erop Jan 30 '16 at 22:23
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You definitely need a static IP address for the DHCP server, period; it just wouldn't work any other way. You also need a static IP adddress for the physical server, because of course it starts before any VM and so it would be unable to contact the DHCP server upon starting.

So, you have two servers, and both of them need static IP addressing. End of the question.

Also, why exactly would you want to use DHCP here?!? What sort of sense would it make?

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  • first of all thanks for reply! I just thought something like "dynamic is better than static". That is why I asked about it. And your straight reply throw this thought away of my head. – erop Jan 30 '16 at 22:23

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