0

I received a mail from google: Report domain: domain2.com Submitter google.com Report-ID: 172678634XXXX With an XML file in a zipped file containing:

  <record>
<row>
  <source_ip>192.34.ZZZ.XXX</source_ip>
  <count>3</count>
  <policy_evaluated>
    <disposition>none</disposition>
    <dkim>pass</dkim>
    <spf>fail</spf>
  </policy_evaluated>
</row>

I have several domains on the same server. The mail domain (domain1.com) with reverse DNS has this SPF :

v=spf1 ip4:192.34.ZZZ.XXX mx:domain1.com include:domain1.com include:domain2.com ~all

The SPF domain2.com is:

v=spf1 a mx ip4:192.34.ZZZ.YYY ~all

So what is wrong ? Why do I have reports from google.com with failed SPF ?

Thanks.

  • Do you really have an SPF record trying to include itself? – Michael Hampton Sep 28 '16 at 22:58
0

The fact that you have multiple domains using the same server is irrelevant to SPF. Domains that use Google Apps typically have only one entry in SPF, but Google Apps probably hosts millions of domains. All you're trying to say with an SPF record is the servers that are authorized to send mail on behalf of the domain.

Set up SPF records in the DNS for each domain separately and independently. In the SPF records list the IP / domain of the server(s) that can send mail on behalf of that domain. Ignore other domains on this server while you're doing that. Here's a working example for a site that uses Google Apps, which may be helpful to show you what they usually look like.

v=spf1 a mx include:_spf.google.com ~all

I suspect your problem is you haven't set up SPF for domain2 in that domains DNS.

Update2

The SPF records for your domain1 are malformed. Remove the recursive references.

MXToolbox says the problem with your domain2 is the PTR record, with a reverse lookup. It's only a warning though, not an error. I don't even have PTR records for my domains and both SPF and DKIM pass with no problems.

So in the end, I don't think any of that actually answers your question as things seem fine to me. I would send an email to accounts on a number of reputable email providers (office 365, fastmail, zoho, etc) to see if they pass your SPF. If not the headers in the email will probably give a bit more detail.

  • I don't use Google Apps, I just received emails from google. And I received also emails from hotmail.com at hostmaster@domain1.com with the same xml file. And I have SPF records in the DNS for each domains: v=spf1 ip4:192.34.ZZZ.XXX mx:domain1.com include:domain1.com include:domain2.com ~all for domain1.com and v=spf1 a mx ip4:192.34.ZZZ.YYY ~all for domain2.com – London Smith Sep 28 '16 at 21:26
  • 1
    I didn't say you use Google, it was an example. Read my update - I think your SPF record is potentially malformed, and you should post your actual domain name if you want further help. It's much easier to check what's actually happening than to try to understand your explanation. – Tim Sep 28 '16 at 21:36
  • Answer updated. In summary I can't see a problem with domain2, I'd check SPF with a number of providers to see if there's really a problem. – Tim Sep 28 '16 at 23:32
  • OK, thank you Tim for your help. I couldn't see any problem that's why I didn't understand the meaning of the mails sent by google or hotmail. When the create account form of domain2.com send a message to a gmail account, I receive it with no problem and the header all is OK for SPF, DKIM and DMARC. I am going to keep on investigating but I think that I will finish by ignoring these reports. :) – London Smith Sep 29 '16 at 0:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.