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I am trying to find an alternative means for hosting a virtual machine (at work we have a server that hosts our virtual machines currently running on a Xen Server 6.5 host).

My questions is, is there a way to share the virtual machine/session across to another host out side of the network to one of our locations have have a better network speed (our main office is currently dual DSL connections....). In ~3 months we will have 100M symmetrical so it won't be as much a hassle when working remote as it is now when 3-4 of us are running on the server remote (locally works great since well we are local), but I enjoy being able to go home from time to time.

Currently remotely the main virtual machine is a single windows VW (Windows 7 to be more specific), but we also have a few Linux guests as well for software testing/writing). The Windows Guest is mainly uses for Windows specific APPs as most of our machines are Linux based.

I am open to having a different host than Xen.

We have btsync and a couple other services set up for the file sharing to a couple people as a test for the file side of the sharing, but any and all help or directions would be appreciated.

edit

*****main host***** *---local network ---> local connections * ****Secondary host (remote location with better internet connection...) *----->serves up the sessions to the guests with remote connections still accessing the same "guest" that the local network had

This in turn allows the user to have a better connection to the VM depending on where they are at and which they connect to.... This also could act as a failover if the main or secondary were to go down...

"_ I am looking for something where the guest is hosted from the best host per say, similar to load balancing of a web server. For example in the case of working locally we would use the local server. Once done we could close the connection or end the session. Once getting home or remote from the office we could access the remote server to dish up a similar session to the one we left at the office, this would also in-turn i guess be basically a backup of the main host. I am adding an edit above to make it more clear hopefully...._"

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    This won't help since the VM state would need to be transported over the same uplink. With VM migration you still need to transfer data. If you had something like a SAN where you store the VM so it can be started on the "best" location/host, you still have to pipe that over your current uplink. Basically, there is no networked scenario that is not effected by your connection. – John Keates Dec 8 '16 at 6:36
  • Would there be a way with a syncing software like btsync to "sync" the guests, changes system files, that way only the changed/modified portion is piped over from one location to the next so we aren't transfering the virtual screen over a connection, but instead updating each locations "session environment" per say??? – Friendlyghost89 Dec 8 '16 at 13:17
  • That is what shared storage already does, but a complete OS takes way more storage than a few files or applications. That's why it will not be very fast over a slow link. Basically, transferring a VM or changes to a VM is always going to take more bandwidth than a RDP or VNC session. If your link isn't fast enough for RDP/VNC, it won't be fast enough for anything else either. – John Keates Dec 9 '16 at 0:45
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You can look into VMware ESXi, which is free with some cpu limits, and use its built in web dashboard (ESXi Embedded Host Client) or vsphere client to share sessions on virtual machines, if I understood your question correctly.

Users from multiple locations can access the VM by connecting to your VMware host, and use console access to VM in the client app.

When you access virtual machine using console access over a vsphere client, multiple users will be able see the same session in their vpshere clients, as they will all see the same console or desktop of your VM.

  • I am looking for something where the guest is hosted from the best host per say, similar to load balancing of a web server. For example in the case of working locally we would use the local server. Once done we could close the connection or end the session. Once getting home or remote from the office we could access the remote server to dish up a similar session to the one we left at the office, this would also in-turn i guess be basically a backup of the main host. I am adding an edit above to make it more clear hopefully.... – Friendlyghost89 Dec 8 '16 at 4:43

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