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I am using ZFS(ZoL) over LUKS on home and on remote server. All is working perfectly and fast. I do snapshots by cron, but now I want to replicate them to some backup storage. I have a small 2-HDD dlink dns-323 nas, on which I have debian installed. My requirement is to have backups encrypted. I am not sure I can install ZFS and Luks into NAS. My question may be very stupid, I know it sounds crazy, but I have only one idea in this scenario. Create LUKS and ZPOOL on NAS, but unlock and run it remotely by LAN on a workstation. By NFS or NBD. How that sounds? If my lan connection is stable and ok, will it run fine? I thought about rsync, zfs send/gpg, but I need an ability to remove some snapshots on backup box and want it to be managed automatically, and keep synced with master. Any ideas?

  • It isn't complete automatic, but scripted easily. I been using borg for remote backups. It supports encryption. – Zoredache Feb 21 '17 at 21:05
  • Thanks, I know about other backup tools, and used duplicity before. Was very cool. But now after discovering ZFS, I want to use it's features. In such backup systems like borg or duplicity you can't remove intermediary backups for N period, just because you don't need them anymore. And you keep all synced and automatically removing unneeded snapshots – Ural Feb 22 '17 at 7:36
  • In such backup systems like borg ... you can't remove intermediary backups for N period - Yes, you can. It isn't automatic, but with borg I can make backups every day, and for backups older then a week only keep one a week, dropping the intermediate dailies. I get the idea of liking ZFS, and wanting to take advantages of the features, but I kinda like having my backup system operating using a different technology from my production system, just in case that production decides to get fubar'd, I don't want that to mean my backups are also screwed. – Zoredache Feb 22 '17 at 7:53

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