5

It appears that Microsoft removed this registry key in Server 2016.

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\Auto Update\Results\Install

Does anyone know of an equivalent registry key that has the last Windows Update install success date/time? Or perhaps a different method of querying this value?

I've spent hours googling, but have found nothing. Closest registry key I can find is:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU

However, it has no key for last successful install date/time.

1

Tested and this guy's find did work:

Get-WmiObject -Class win32_reliabilityRecords -filter "sourcename = 'Microsoft-
Windows-WindowsUpdateClient'" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue |
select @{LABEL = "date";EXPRESSION = {$_.ConvertToDateTime($_.timegenerated)}}, 
@{LABEL = 'Update';EXPRESSION = {$_.message}} |
FT -AutoSize -Wrap

Gives you a nice summary:

date                 Update
----                 ------
8/18/2017 8:39:51 AM Installation Successful: Windows successfully installed 
the following update: 2017-08 Cumulative Update for Windows Server 2016 for 
x64-based Systems (KB4034658)
...

Of course you could just take out the description & titles if you just want the date itself.

https://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/28713293/How-to-get-last-success-date-time-of-Windows-Update-on-Windows-10.html

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/heyscriptingguy/2011/08/22/use-powershell-to-easily-find-information-about-hotfixes/

0

You could use the Setup Event log. Something like this?

Get-WinEvent -LogName Setup | where{$_.message -match "success"} | select -First 1

I normally check recently installed events like this:

Get-WinEvent -LogName Setup -MaxEvents 5 | Format-Table Machinename,Timecreated,Message -A -Wr

I did test and it does work on 2016 as well.

0

I use:

    Invoke-Command -ComputerName  $ComputerName -ScriptBlock { (New-Object -com "Microsoft.Update.AutoUpdate").Results.LastInstallationSuccessDate} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

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