1

I'm writing to ask for your opinion about this.

SCENARIO

I have domain.local (forest and domain tree root) with these domain controllers:

DC1 | SO: Windows Server 2008 R2 | Roles: Schema, DomainNaming, PDC, RID, Infrastructure, DNS Server

  • IP1: 172.16.1.10
  • IP2: 172.16.1.11
  • IP3: 172.16.1.12

DC2 | SO: Windows Server 2008 R2 | Role: DNS Server

  • IP1: 172.16.1.20
  • IP2: 172.16.1.21
  • IP3: 172.16.1.22

DC3 | SO: Windows Server 2012 R2 | Role: DNS Server, DHCP Failover Load Balance Mode

  • IP: 172.16.1.30

DC4 | SO: Windows Server 2012 R2 | Role: DNS Server, DHCP Failover Load Balance Mode

  • IP: 172.16.1.40

Notes:

  • They are all Global Catalog.
  • DHCP is configured to assign DC1-IP1 and DC2-IP1 as primary and secondary DNS respectively to clients.
  • DC1-IP1 and DC2-IP1 are used as primary and secondary DNS (static) on servers and related applications

OBJECTIVES

  1. Assign DC1-IP1 to DC3
  2. Assign DC2-IP1 to DC4
  3. DC3 and DC4 will have only one IP Address: 172.16.1.10 and 172.16.1.20 respectively.
  4. Dismiss DC1 and DC2

TASKS

These are steps I intend to follow:

  1. Move all roles from DC1 to DC3 and wait for AD replication
  2. DC1 - Remove IP1
  3. DC1 - Run ipconfig /flushdns, ipconfig /registerdns and dcdiag /fix
  4. Wait for AD replication
  5. DC3 - Add DC1-IP1 and remove its IP (172.16.1.30)
  6. DC3 - Run ipconfig /flushdns, ipconfig /registerdns and dcdiag /fix
  7. DC1 - Demote and remove

Then apply the steps above (from 2 to 7) for DC2 and DC4.

What is your opinion ? Do you suggest to switch between steps ? Or do I forgot something ?

Thank you a lot.

Regards, Luca

migrated from superuser.com Apr 6 '17 at 12:25

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  • 1
    I don't get why you're making it so complicated. Follow Removing a Domain Controller from a Domain to remove any DC you want. Just deploy a server that has the right configuration and add it as a DC to the domain instead of juggling all that junk. Is there a specific reason that it's not an option? – Seth Apr 6 '17 at 13:21
  • "Removing DC" is listed in my steps but set as last operation. "Just deploy a server": I already have it; it is DC03. So I think my steps are simply detailed but what you propose is pretty the same I wrote (I think) – Luca Fabbri Apr 7 '17 at 15:13
  • Not entirely. Instead of having an establish DC that you try to coax into taking the role of DC1, I'd opt to decommission DC1 and setup a new DC in it's place that has the correct configuration from the get go. Change the static IP of a DC would make your plan valid. Still I feel like it's a bit complicated, though you probably have your reasons. – Seth Apr 7 '17 at 16:20
1

If you want to remove DC1, DC2 and DC4.

  • Move all AD Roles from DC1 to DC3.
  • Change DHCP to give just DC3 as DNS (check time for DHCP to lease IPs) and wait that time, so all the clients' computer get the new DNS).
  • Demote DC1, DC2 and DC4 (to check replication check, AD sites and services that should be all running ok. Since you will only have 1 DC in the domain.

For best practices Microsoft recommends to use 2 domain controllers at least on the same site.

UPDATED

  • Move all AD Roles from DC1 to DC3.
  • Change DHCP to give just DC3 as DNS (check time for DHCP to lease IPs) and wait that time, so all the clients' computer gets the new DNS).
  • Demote DC1 and DC2
  • Change IP from DC4 to the one that had DC2. (now you have DC4 with DC2 IP)
  • Change DHCP to give just the IP of DC2 as DNS (wait the time)
  • Change IP from DC3 to match old DC1 (now you have DC3 with DC1 IP)
  • Add DHCP to give IPs from DC3 and DC4 as DNS

  • I don't want to remove DC3. To simplify: I need to have DC3 and DC4 with IP addresses of DC1 and DC2 respectively. And remove DC1 and DC2 from infrastructure. I know how to do this, I'd like to know better steps order. – Luca Fabbri Apr 7 '17 at 15:17
  • I have updated the answer (I thought you wanted to have just DC3, (not DC4). – Jose Ortega Apr 7 '17 at 15:23

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