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I have the below questions with regard to server connectvity to two different upstream switch.

Q1: In one of the blogs i read that many server NIC drivers support LACP as well for providing a port channel between a server and its upstream switch. Is it therefore possible to directly connect a server to 2 different upstream switches and run those uplinks(each going to 2 different upstream switch) in LACP as a portchannel ? (i know about vPC, but this definitely is not vPC--is that correct understanding?)

Q2:What would be the switchport mode of the above ports on the upstream switches? Will it be access or trunk ? why?

Q3:I have seen a topology where the server is connected to 2 different upstream switches. The Server is operating in active/standby teaming. Please explain if this would work or fail. What would be the switchport mode of the ports on the upstream switches?Will it be access or trunk? Which protocol would be used for these connection ( LACP or any other specific protocol).

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Is it therefore possible to directly connect a server to 2 different upstream switches and run those uplinks(each going to 2 different upstream switch) in LACP as a portchannel ?

If the switches are stacked and they support cross-chassis LACP then yes this will work. If they're standalone switches, it will not work.

What would be the switchport mode of the above ports on the upstream switches? Will it be access or trunk ? why?

This question is orthogonal to whether or not you're using LACP.

I have seen a topology where the server is connected to 2 different upstream switches. The Server is operating in active/standby teaming. Please explain if this would work or fail. What would be the switchport mode of the ports on the upstream switches?Will it be access or trunk? Which protocol would be used for these connection ( LACP or any other specific protocol).

Of course it can work. Whether or not it will in your situation depends completely on what hardware you have to work with and whether or not it supports this configuration.

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