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I want to implement NAS solution for home usage, to keep data I care about. NAS offers RAID against disk failure, but what if the NAS box itself fails? Do I need two replicating NAS devices for a trustworthy storage? The amount of data is few Tb in size and while it is not many for a hard drive in these days, I think that much might be expensive to keep just in the cloud.

An idea that comes to my head is to buy two small single drive NAS boxes replicating each other. Would you recommend better solution?

closed as off-topic by mdpc, kasperd, MadHatter, Andrew Schulman, Nils Jan 16 '18 at 15:52

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  • You have to define trustworthy, and what you are willing to pay to get that level of trust. It is entirely possible that two fail (power surge, fire, etc). – Ron Maupin Dec 11 '17 at 19:50
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    Looks like prices are in the range of about 20 - 30$ per month for a terabyte of storage. I can buy a brand new 10 Tb NAS at least twice a year for the money it costs to keep the same data in the cloud, and one of the "unrecoverable disasters" is running out of money one day to support your cloud storage (unemployment, retirement, etc). No, cloud seems not yet there. – h22 Dec 12 '17 at 11:13
  • Assuming you're using RAID-1 on your NAS (and if you're not the first answer to this question is instantly obvious) that means you're picking up 10TB HDDs for about $90 each - and there's another answer. Stop buying consumer-grade HDDs for your NAS, and failures will be substantially reduced. After doing RAID-1 with professional-grade HDDs, backups are the answer, as joeqwerty says - whether to the cloud or to some local alternative storage. – MadHatter Jan 3 '18 at 8:08
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NAS offers RAID against disk failure, but what if the NAS box itself fails? Do I need two replicating NAS devices for a trustworthy storage?

RAID is not a backup. You should back up the data on your NAS to a trusted storage device if you want to be able to restore your data in the event that the NAS fails outright.

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