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When reading about repeater usage (without crossband-repeating) it is said that the bandwith is at minimum reduced by 50% because the repeater has to repeat every bit of communication. In principle i can live with this Statement, but how would you calculate this for different Connection Scenarios?

Lets assume to have a 2.4Ghz Wifi and there is only one host who is sending 100Mbit of data.

Scenario 1

Host < 100 Mbps > Repeater < 100 Mbps > Wifi-Router

Exchange speed between Host an repeater is same as Exchange Speed between Repeater an Wifi-Router. Bandwith ist reduced to 50 Mbps for Host, because of double amount of time (1s to Repeater + 1s to Router = 2s at all).

Scenario 2

Host < 100 Mbps > Repeater < 50 Mbps > Wifi-Router

Exchange speed between Host an repeater is not the same as Exchange Speed between Repeater an Wifi-Router. I would say the bandwith is reduced to 33 Mbps for Host, because of triple amount of time (1s to Repeater + 2s to Router = 3s at all).

Scenario 3

Host < 100 Mbps > Repeater < 200 Mbps > Wifi-Router

Exchange speed between Host an repeater is not the same as Exchange Speed between Repeater an Wifi-Router. I would say the bandwith is reduced to 66 Mbps for Host, because of 1,5 amount of time (1s to Repeater + 0,5s to Router = 1,5s at all).

Is this the way you would calculate the bandwith?

  • I would imagine that you cut in half the speed of the slowest link. In your Scenario 2, it would be 25 Mbps. The repeater will receive a frame, the need to send it, but it can't listen for a second frame while sending the first. Its speed will be half of its 50 Mbps. – Ron Maupin Dec 27 '17 at 9:45
  • But in this case the speed with which the frame is forwarded by the repeater wouldnt have any influence, or am I overlooking something? This feels somehow wrong to me (simplification). – omonsees Dec 28 '17 at 9:12

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