3

I am setting up a new Hyper-V 2016 server. The physical machine has 6 network ports. I read that it is best practice to have one network port dedicated to remote management of the Hyper-V Host, so that leaves me with 5 ports. I have 2 subnets - a LAN and a DMZ. Some of the VMs that will live on this server will be in the LAN, and some will be in the DMZ.

So in the Network Adapter control panel I have the following:

  • Onboard NIC 1 10.0.0.140
  • Onboard NIC 2 10.0.0.141

  • Slot 1 Port 1 10.0.0.150

  • Slot 1 Port 2 10.0.0.151
  • Slot 1 Port 3 192.168.12.150
  • Slot 1 Port 4 192.168.12.151

I am thinking it would be best to team 2 of the NICs to be used for the LAN. Then take 2 more and use that for the DMZ.

So in Server Manager I enabled NIC Teaming and then I created 2 switch-independent dynamic Teams, as follows:

Slot 1 Port 1 \
               |---- LAN   10.0.0.152
Slot 1 Port 2 /



Slot 1 Port 3 \
               |---- DMZ   192.168.12.152
Slot 1 Port 4 /

After creating the teams, The 4 individual NICs are in a sense no longer used. IPv4 is unchecked in each of their Properties windows, and they are part of the team.

First question:

  1. Can I re-use the IPs I had manually assigned to these 4 NICs? Are are they still necessary? (I am not hurting for IPs. I am just curious if they are now available to me as long as those NICs are part of a Team)

Next, I am going to install the Hyper-V role. During the installation of Hyper-V, the wizard says "One virtual switch will be created for each network adapter you select". In the list, I see the 2 teams I created ("LAN" and "DMZ") but interestingly I ALSO see the individual NICs here in the list.

  1. Why would the individual NICs appear here? If I select them and the wizard creates a virtual switch, does my NIC team break?

  2. Should I select the teamed NICs only?

  3. So later on let's say I create my first hyper-v vm, assign the teamed NIC called 'LAN' to it, and install Windows. When I log into that VM, I assume I will only have one network adapter. But is the throughput of this adapter "teamed" meaning 2gb instead of 1gb?

...or... Should I NOT team the NICs on the Hyper-V host, and INSTEAD, assign the same 2 NICs to each VM and then inside the VM, do the teaming?

What's the best practice way to take advantage of multiple NICs on a physical host so that each of the VMs get the maximum network throughput? Team the NICs on the Hyper-V Host? Or instead, team the NICs inside of each VM?

3
  1. Yes, IPs can be re-used.

  2. The team will not break if you create vSwitch manually (just keep in mind to double check MAC addresses on the teamed adapter and newly created vSwitch. I had them duplicated a couple of times for whatever reason). As for the wizard, I'm unsure and I do not recommend using it in your case. Hyper-V simply scans all network adapters including teamed NICs that's why you see them. This is almost the same as running "Get-NetAdapter" in PowerShell.

  3. Yes, if you want to present the teamed network as the virtual switch, you must select the teamed adapter.

  4. It will be shown as 10GbE. Speaking of throughput, your mileage may vary. The teamed network will almost never give you x2 x3 x"N" performance in the typical point-to-point data transfer operation. Teaming networks helps to increase the maximum "pipe" width for those cases when you have multiple clients connecting to a single SMB share, folder, etc.

  5. Here is some useful reading: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/virtualization/hyper-v/plan/plan-hyper-v-networking-in-windows-server

0
  1. You can definitely reuse all of those IPs. The NICs are now being treated as a single NIC for most logical network purposes as long as they're part of the team
  2. I'm not sure why Microsoft would leave them in. It would most likely break the NIC team if you selected one but this is probably just an odd wizard choice by MS and you should ignore it.

  3. You should only select the NIC teams to use for creating the virtual switch(es). Like I mentioned in 1 the NIC teams are essentially treated as a single NIC so selecting those will get you setup properly.

  4. That's correct, it should be at a maximum 2Gb (minus some overhead). It will probably show as 10Gb because that is the speed the virtual link could operate at but your real network bandwidth will be the 2Gb.

  5. You should definitely do the teaming on the host. Doing it in the VMs just shifts the networking overhead of handling the team to a slightly more inefficient location (within the vm). As a thought, are your subnets handled by the same switch/infrastructure or are they totally separate physically or by VLAN? If they're on the same switch and only separated by their different subnets you could team all 5 available NICs and simply assign the IPs as necessary to each VM. The virtual switch (and NIC team) would handle the traffic fine.
  • "are your subnets handled by the same switch/infrastructure or are they totally separate physically or by VLAN?" - The LAN subnet is using one switch, and the DMZ is using another. "If they're on the same switch and only separated by their different subnets you could team all 5 available NICs and simply assign the IPs as necessary to each VM. The virtual switch (and NIC team) would handle the traffic fine" - Interesting. I'm going to consider spending a few weekend hours combining the 2 subnets onto one switch (using VLAN) and then that would allow me to make all 4 ports part of 1 team. – E C Feb 16 '18 at 7:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.